Friday, June 27, 2008

Summer Heat.... Summer Storms?

Here's a look back at high temperatures from around the region from Thursday:
  • Erwin: 100
  • Goldsboro: 99
  • Henderson-Oxford: 99
  • Southern Pines: 99
  • Chapel Hill: 97
  • Fayetteville: 97
  • Louisburg: 97
  • Raleigh-Durham: 97
  • Smithfield: 97
  • Laurinburg: 95
  • Lumberton: 95
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 95

We expect to see highs back into the mid 90s today and Saturday. Factor in the humidity, and it will feel more like 100. A few afternoon thunderstorms will be possible the next couple of days, but the greatest chance for more widespread storms looks to come on Sunday. The Storm Prediction Center has placed much of the Carolinas under the slight risk for severe weather on Sunday.


A few of the afternoon storms over the weekend could produce damaging winds and hail. Stay tuned to News 14 Carolina for Weather on the Ones updates through the weekend for the latest.

Thursday, June 26, 2008

Heat Continues, Drought Continues....

Today should be the hottest of the week with highs in the upper 90s to near 100 -- just above highs from Wednesday. Here's a look at highs from yesterday around the region:



  • Southern Pines: 97
  • Goldsboro: 96
  • Laurinburg: 96
  • Erwin: 95
  • Fayetteville: 95
  • Henderson-Oxford: 95
  • Raleigh-Durham: 95
  • Lumberton: 94
  • Louisburg: 93
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 93
  • Smithfield: 93

When it comes to the drought, there has been no change over the last week despite receiving some heavy thunderstorms over the weekend.

Moderate drought conditions continue in the eastern part of the state with a severe drought from the western side of the Triangle through the Triad. Parts of western North Carolina are in an extreme to exceptional drought.

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

The Heat is On

Afternoon temperatures will continue to soar into the 90s for the next several days, and the triple digits look to be more obtainable on Thursday than previously thought. As of Tuesday, the Raleigh-Durham Airport has hit a high of 90 or higher 16 days this month. Compare that to 13 days of 90 degree days in June of last year, 8 days in June 2006, 12 days in June 2005, and 9 days in June 2004.

Thursday should be the hottest day of the week with highs in the upper 90s to near 100. The record high for Thursday stands at 102 set in 1952.

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Heating up....

News 14 Carolina meteorologist Joshua McKinney has been very busy the last several afternoons tracking thunderstorms across North Carolina. It looks like we'll get a break from tracking storms the next couple of days. Instead, we'll be tracking the temperature upwards the next few afternoons. The mid to upper 90s will be possible by Thursday. At least it will not be quite as hot as earlier this month. We should stay away from the triple digits this week.

Scattered thunderstorms will return to the forecast by the weekend. Stay tuned to Weather on the Ones and News 14 Carolina...

Monday, June 23, 2008

More Storms for Monday

After a weekend featuring afternoon thunderstorms, we can look for more of the same on Monday. A few of the storms over the weekend were strong with heavy downpours, damaging winds, and hail.

Here's a look at storm reports from Saturday....

and from Sunday....

We again see some strong storms again today. The Storm Prediction Center has outlined most of the Carolinas for a slight risk for severe weather.

The greatest threat from the storms today will be from damaging winds, hail, and again some localized heavy downpours. Today's storms will be scattered across the area meaning not everyone will see the heavy rain. For example, over the weekend the Raleigh-Durham Airport recorded over 2 inches of rain from Saturday and Sunday while Wilson saw less than 0.10" of rain.

Stay tuned to Weather on the Ones and News 14 Carolina through the afternoon and evening for the latest updates. If storms occur in your neighborhood, you can send your storm reports and photos to weather@news14.com.


Sunday, June 15, 2008

A return to seasonal temperatures this week

**Flash Flood Warning This morning until 10:30 for Fayetteville, Cumberland county**


Partly to mostly cloudy with a chance of showers and thunderstorms, especially south and east of the Triangle.
Highs in the upper 80s.
Cloudy with storms ending tonight.
Lows near 70. Variable clouds Monday with a chance for showers and storms later in the day. Highs near 90.

This week our weather pattern changes. I'm sure you remember the triple-digit heat we had just recently. That was due to a ridge of high pressure not only at the surface, but at higher levels of the atmosphere. That was a perfect pattern for a heat wave as not only did downward-moving air compress and heat up, but upper-level ridges mean that cooler air masses are kept at bay. We have been in a transition pattern, and will see a cooler pattern this coming week as a surface cold front brings more seasonal temperatures (mid to upper 80s are the 'normal' highs for this week). This will be accompanied by an upper level trough which will support these temperatures and perhaps keep a cloud or two overhead from time to time.

Heavy Rains Produce Flash Flooding in our Area this Morning

From the National Weather Service, Raleigh:



732 AM EDT SUN JUN 15 2008
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN RALEIGH HAS ISSUED A
* FLASH FLOOD WARNING FOR...
CUMBERLAND COUNTY IN CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA
* UNTIL 1030 AM EDT
* AT 723 AM EDT... FLASH FLOODING IN CENTRAL CUMBERLAND COUNTY.
* LOCATIONS THREATENED WITH FLOODING INCLUDE FAYETTEVILLE.
PUBLIC REPORTS HAVE RELAYED TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER THAT CROSS CREEK
IN DOWNTOWN FAYETTEVILLE HAS OVERFLOWED THE BANKS...RESULTING IN
APPROXIMATELY 1 FOOT OF SWIFTLY FLOWING WATER ON RAY AVENUE.
ALTHOUGH THE HEAVIER RAINS HAVE MOVED EAST OF THE AREA...LIGHT TO
MODERATE RAIN WILL PRODUCE ANOTHER A QUARTER TO HALF INCH RAINFALL
THROUGH 900 AM.
A FLASH FLOOD WARNING MEANS THAT FLOODING IS IMMINENT OR OCCURRING.
IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING FLOODING OR LIVE IN A FLOOD PRONE AREA MOVE
TO HIGHER GROUND IMMEDIATELY. THOSE LIVING NEAR CREEKS AND STREAMS
SHOULD MONITOR WATER LEVELS CLOSELY AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE QUICK
ACTION.
MOST FLOOD DEATHS OCCUR IN AUTOMOBILES. NEVER DRIVE YOUR VEHICLE INTO
AREAS WHERE THE WATER COVERS THE ROADWAY. FLOOD WATERS ARE USUALLY
DEEPER THAN THEY APPEAR. JUST ONE FOOT OF FLOWING WATER IS POWERFUL
ENOUGH TO SWEEP VEHICLES OFF THE ROAD. WHEN ENCOUNTERING FLOODED
ROADS...TURN AROUND...DONT DROWN.

Thursday, June 12, 2008

Additional Information about our Smoky Situation

The NC Division of Air Quality has issued new information about the smoke which has drifted westward into more of our viewing area.

In a release published this afternoon:

"Current air quality conditions have been caused by smoke from the EvansRoad fire in Hyde County (near Lake Mattamuskeet). Currently, the smoke has filtered as far west as the Triad region, and cloud push furtherwest as the day progresses.
In anticipation of the smoke plume intrusion, Code Orange forecasts forParticle pollution were issued for the Triad, Triangle, and Fayettevilleregions, with a special notice for the Rocky Mount area.
.... As with ozone, particle pollution posses a health risk to youngchildren, active adults, and people with lung disease such as asthma andemphysema. Particle pollution also carries a health risk for people withheart diseases such as coronary artery disease and congestive heartfailure, as these small particles can reach deep into the lungs and canthen be absorbed into the blood stream. During this Code Orange eventchildren, active people, and those with respiratory or heart diseaseshould limit outdoor activity."


You can get current pollutant levels from NCDAQ at the following web sites:By region: http://daq.state.nc.us/ambient/monitors/By pollutant: http://xapps.enr.state.nc.us/aq/ambient/AmbtPollutant.jspBy county/site: http://xapps.enr.state.nc.us/aq/ambient/AmbtSite.jspAdditional information on particle pollution and its health effect canbe found at:NC DAQ FAQ Page: http://daq.state.nc.us/airaware/aqfaq.shtmlEPA’s “Particle Pollution and Your Health” Brochure:http://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=particle.cover

Do you smell smoke?

A smokey smell and haze across our part of North Carolina has had many people asking if something was on fire in their neighborhood this morning. There is something on fire, but its not in our neighborhoods. That smoke is actually from a large wildfire burning toward the coast just west of Manteo. Wind from the east this morning has allowed that smoke to drift into our area giving us a hazy Thursday.

The haze will and smell of smoke will be most evident this morning, but hazy conditions and a faint smell of smoke may linger through the day today.

You can follow the latest on the wildfire burning near the coast by clicking this link from the North Carolina Division of Forest Resources: http://www.dfr.state.nc.us/fire_control/current_fires.htm


Wednesday, June 11, 2008

Tuesday's Highs

Tuesday was the last day for triple digit heat across the area for the week. Another record was set at the Raleigh-Durham Airport when the high reached 101 breaking the old record of 97 set in 1947. Here's a look at other highs from around our area on Tuesday --

  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 101
  • Erwin: 100
  • Henderson-Oxford: 100
  • Fayetteville: 99
  • Goldsboro: 99
  • Laurinburg: 99
  • Lumberton: 98
  • Chapel Hill: 97
  • Raleigh (NCSU): 97
  • Smithfield: 97

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Another Record...

For the fourth straight day, the record high temperature was set at RDU Monday. The high of 100 broke the old record of 98 set in 1999. We'll likely make it a fifth day today. The record for June 10 sits at 97 set in 1947.

Here's a look at other highs from around the area on Monday --
  • Laurinburg: 102
  • Lumberton: 102
  • Fayetteville: 101
  • Goldsboro: 101
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 101
  • Chapel Hill: 100
  • Henderson-Oxford: 100
  • Louisburg: 99
  • Smithfield: 99

Monday, June 09, 2008

Sunday's Highs

Sunday was another record breaker in the Triangle. For the second straight day, the record high at RDU was broken when the temperature topped out at 101 Sunday afternoon. Here's a look at other highs from around the region:

  • Laurinburg: 102
  • Lumberton: 102
  • Fayetteville: 101
  • Goldsboro: 101
  • Erwin: 100
  • Henderson-Oxford: 100
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 100
  • Louisburg: 99
  • Raleigh (NCSU): 99
  • Smithfield: 99
  • Chapel Hill: 98

Sunday, June 08, 2008

Evening Update...

The video discussion will be up and running Monday afternoon. Just in time for the hottest day since August of last year. We're on our way to adding to the record breaking heat as afternoon highs should reach 102 in Raleigh and 103 in Fayetteville.

We've set records in Raleigh for the last three days and here's a list of some of those nasty temps from Sunday afternoon around North Carolina
  • Raleigh: 101
  • Fayetteville: 101
  • Lumberton: 103
  • Charlotte: 99
  • Greensboro: 97

More record-breaking heat on the way

As you saw in our Weather on the Ones post on Saturday, a number of records for daytime highs were set in NC. We also saw some record overnight lows tied or exceeded.
This morning the overnight low of 73 at RDU International tied the record set for this date from just a year ago. Unless the tempreature drops below 73 sometime before midnight, this will go in the books as a tie.
In Greensboro, the record high minimum temperature at PTI airport was set this morning at 73 degrees. Unless the temperature falls below 73 later today, this will replace the record high minimum for june 8th of 72 degrees set last year.

A heat advisory is in effect once again for our area. The combined relative humidity and triple-digit temperatures are expected to produce a heat index (a "feels-like" temperature) of 105-110 degrees. Thats pretty dangerous heat, so please take things slowly once again today, take frequent breaks, drink LOTS of water (and maybe include something to replenish those electrolytes as well) and try to limit your outside activities to either before 10 am or after 6 pm.
Also please take time to check in on your pets and neighbors, as the elderly are easily overlooked in these conditions.
If its not the heat keeping you mindful of your time outdoors, its the ozone levels. The Triangle region is at a code orange which means its unhealthy for sensitive groups. It is a code yellow for the Sandhills.

I put this link on the blogger page as part of an earlier post , but it bears repeating. The National Weather Service put together a list of resources and information for you geared especially toward staying safe in this kind of heat. You can see this by following this link:

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/heat/

Take it easy, keep cool, and have a good Sunday!
Pati Darak

Saturday, June 07, 2008

Evening Update...

No video discussion this weekend. A power surge late last week which caused some technical issues at News 14 Carolina will keep it down until Monday. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Now on to the record highs throughout North Carolina over the last two days. For Raleigh, we experienced the earliest 100 degree day ever at RDU. Beating the old mark by one whole day. This makes two straight days of record breaking heat. It looks like tomorrow will be the peak as highs in Raleigh top out around 103. Keep in mind the all time record high at RDU is 105. We tied that mark in August of last year. The only other time we hit 105 was in 1988!

Here are some other records set in the state on Saturday...
  • Asheville: 92
  • Greensboro: 97
  • Charlotte: 97
  • Raleigh: 100
  • Wilmington: 97
  • New Bern: 98
  • Elizabeth City: 99

Friday, June 06, 2008

Thursday's Highs

  • Erwin: 100
  • Laurinburg: 100
  • Southern Pines: 99
  • Lumberton: 98
  • Fayetteville: 97
  • Goldsboro: 96
  • RDU: 96
  • Raleigh (NCSU): 96
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 96
  • Henderson-Oxford: 95
  • Louisburg: 95
  • Smithfield: 95
  • Chapel Hill: 94

Thursday, June 05, 2008

Heat Advisory Today, Expect the Heat to Stick Around

A heat advisory is in effect today, as the combined heat and humidity will make it feel like 100-105 degrees today.
this is the first heat wave of the season, and we're actually getting more of a late Summer pattern here in the Southeast this week.
I'm going to include a link here from the National Weather Service which will give you a ton of information about heat waves, tips for beating the heat and also reminders to check on those around you who may be vulnerable in this weather.

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/heat/

Here's a brief tip for things to remember during periods of excessive heat:
(courtesy of the National Weather Service): Remember the word " HEAT" (Hydrate, Educate, Act, Take it easy)

Heat waves have caused more deaths, on average, in the last ten years than any other weather hazard, including tornadoes, hurricanes, and flooding (see stats). The National Weather Service's excessive heat alert program includes 7-day heat index forecasts and outlooks, heat advisories and warnings, and special weather statements, all accessible on our home page or via the links below. Don't be a statistic this summer.... BEAT THE HEAT!


Hydrate.
Whether you feel thirsty or not, drink plenty of water to avoid becoming dehydrated, especially when you're working or exercising outside.

Educate yourself.
Keep up with the latest temperature and heat index forecasts and current readings (take actions to stay cool and safe when the temperatures hits 85 degrees or the heat index hits 90 degrees). Know the warning signs of a heat illness, and how you can stay cool.

Act quickly when a heat illness is suspected. Seek medical attention immediately for any of these warning signs: cramping, rapid pulse, heavy sweating, hot red skin, dizziness, confusion, nausea, vomiting.

Take it easy. Anyone working or exercising outdoors should avoid overexertion, especially between the hours of 11 am and 6 pm. Take hourly breaks in the shade or in air conditioning.

In addition to the heat advisory, our present weather pattern also has portions of our viewing area in a code Orange Ozone Action Day as well (Fayetteville is the exception, being in a code yellow this Thursday afternoon) . I don't expect this to improve for us anytime soon, as we have high pressure at the surface and in the upper levels of the atmosphere into next week. What this means for us is if you're particularly sensitive to ground level ozone or pullutants (for example, folks who have respiratory or some heart / circulatory conditions , children, elderly, etc.) you will need to curtail your extended outdoor activities to before 10 am or after 6 pm. If you have questions about your particular condition and how the heat might affect you, please check with your doctor.
Stay tuned to your Weather on the Ones Forecast Center for updates about the air quality, the heat, the UV index forecast (which is at a level of 10 today, meaning its in the unhealthy level; about 10 minutes before you'll experience sun damage without sunscreen, so have it handy, apply it as a habit!) and other weather information as you "weather" your 2008 summer in North Carolina!

Stay Cool!
Pati Darak
Weather On the Ones Meteorologist,
News 14 Carolina

Wednesday, June 04, 2008

Afternoon Update

video

Records to Watch

With the mercury climbing today and the next several days, we will come close to record high temperatures. Here's a look at the records to watch for RDU --
  • Wednesday: 96 (2002)
  • Thursday: 99 (2002)
  • Friday: 98 (2002)
  • Saturday: 97 (1947)
  • Sunday: 100 (1999)

That record on June 8 of 100 is the earliest date RDU has ever recorded a high of 100. Records have been kept there since 1944.

Tuesday, June 03, 2008

Late Afternoon Update

Humidity along with daytime heating is triggering storms over the North Carolina Piedmont. Large hail along with damaging winds are all expected within any stronger storm. Some of this could get as close as our western counties before 6pm. A few storms have already reached severe limits with hail to the size of golf balls over Rowan County being reported. Right now, no watches are in the works as most of the strongest storms should weaken towards sunset.

Afternoon Update...

Check out this video from Iowa!



It shows the frightenting power of an EF-5 tornado as it slams into a bank building on May 25, 2008 in Parkersburg, IA. This was the first EF-5 tornado to strike Iowa since June of 1976.

A little closer to North Carolina we're watching for the potential for severe storms over the Western part of the state this afternoon.

It appears that most of the stronger storms will remain over the Foothills of North Carolina. However, there's the potential for a stray storm over the Western edge of the viewing area as we reach the late afternoon and early evening.

Early Heat Wave

By the end of this week, it will feel like we bypassed June and July and headed straight for August. A heat wave is in the forecast beginning Thursday and Friday, and it's not even officially summer yet! Afternoon temperatures are expected to reach the mid 90s by the end of the week. Some upper 90s are even possible in the Sandhills on Thursday. When you factor in the humidity, those late week temperatures may feel more like 100 or 105.

We'll have to watch the upcoming heat wave closely not only because of health dangers related to heat but also because of the danger of creeping back into a drought. Earlier this spring, rain brought much need relief to the drought in our part of the state. However, last week, we saw the area of extreme drought in western North Carolina expand. With temperatures rising to the mid 90s, evaporation rates will rise this week. Water usage may very well rise as well. A few isolated thunderstorms may pop up during the afternoons with daytime heating, but these summer-like storms do not provide widespread soaking rains. Instead, the isolated storms usually produce brief locally heavy downpours that do not provide the widespread rains needed to alleviate a drought.

The upcoming heat wave may last for a while. Computer models show signs of highs staying in the mid 90s through at least the first half of next week. Stay tuned to Weather on the Ones and News 14 Carolina for updates on this early start to summer...