Saturday, December 19, 2009

NC Snowfall Update


Viewer photo above from Wendell Hull of Durham. Send your weather pictures to weather@news14.com.
Here's a look at updated snowfall totals from around NC...
  • West Robbinsville (Graham Co.): 24.0"
  • West Asheville: 17.0"
  • East Marion: 15.0"
  • Boone: 14.0"
  • Sparta: 14.0"
  • Mount Airy: 11.0"
  • Lewisville: 7.2"
  • Pilot Mountain: 7.0"
  • Roxboro: 6.7"
  • Greensboro: 4.5" - 5.5"
  • Kernersville: 5.0"
  • Burlington: 3.8"
  • Henderson: 3.0"
  • High Point: 3.0"
  • Elon: 2.7"
  • Lexington: 2.5"
  • Mebane: 2.0"
  • Durham: 1.3"
  • Chapel Hill: 0.5"
  • Morrisville: 0.5"
  • Clayton: Trace
  • Raleigh: Trace

Friday, December 18, 2009

Friday Morning Update

As of this posting around 9:30am, reports of sleet are coming in from around Charlotte with snow just to the west of Charlotte and up around Hickory. Winter weather is spreading into central North Carolina and any accumulations into the early afternoon should be mainly slushy with temperatures hovering in the mid 30s.

We expect snow or a mix of snow and sleet around the Triangle around midday into the early afternoon. Locations south and east of Raleigh should see mainly all rain, although it may start with just a little sleet. The snow or wintry mix should change to mainly rain around Raleigh by this evening. However, that mix may continue through the evening just north and west of Raleigh. That's why the National Weather Service has upgraded Durham, Orange, Chatham, Granville, Vance, and Warren Counties to a Winter Storm Warning along with locations across the Triad.

Heavier snow accumulations should still come to the northwest of the Triangle with this storm. Around Winston-Salem to Boone and north into Virginia, there may be some pockets of up to a foot of snow! In our area, 2-4" are possible across Durham, Orange, Granville, and Vance Counties. The northern parts of those counties may see more. Areas around Raleigh and Wake County may see just a light slushy accumulation. Perhaps, up to 2" in northern and western parts of the County.

We still think there will be a sharp cut over between just a cold rain and accumulating snow. If that rain/snow line doesn't fall exactly where forecasted, weather conditions could be dramatically different. Stay tuned....

You can keep us informed of the latest weather in your area through the day and night. Send us an e-mail to weather@news14.com.

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Update on the Threat for Winter Weather

Some details on the threat for winter winter in central North Carolina are coming together, but uncertainty still remains in the forecast. We're watching low pressure developing this morning in the Gulf of Mexico that is expected to track up the North Carolina coast late Friday into Saturday. We now anticipate the precipitation to begin as early as midday Friday or Friday afternoon and continue into Saturday. This storm will have a sharp snow to rain line, and just 15 miles could be the difference between a cold rain and significant snowfall accumulation. And the track of the low could easily swing that snow/rain line just to the east or just to the west making a big difference in the weather you will see in your neighborhood.

I'll break down my latest thoughts on the forecast by region...

Triangle
Precipitation should start Friday afternoon as a wintry mix or perhaps as all snow, but we anticipate that to change to mainly rain Friday evening. It may change back to a mix or snow as the precipitation ends Saturday. The rain/snow line may be located over the Triangle during the entire storm. That could mean areas Raleigh to the east see very little snow while Durham and Chapel Hill experience accumulation. At this point, a couple of inches is possible across the Triangle with higher accumulations across northern Durham and Orange Counties. Warmer ground temperatures may limit accumulations in some cases unless the precipitation falls at heavy rate.

Granville and Vance Counties (near the VA border)
Significant snowfall accumulation is possible in this area including around Oxford and Henderson as mainly all snow is expected Friday evening, Friday night, and Saturday morning. Travel will likely be impacted in this area.

Wilson, Wayne, and Johnston Counties
The precipitation should mainly fall as just a cold rain in these areas unless the track of the low shifts.

Sandhills
The precipitation should mainly be a cold rain around Fayetteville and Lumberton, but some snow is possible northwest of Fayetteville around Southern Pines and Pinehurst. Some accumulating snow is possible in Moore County.

Coastal areas
Precipitation will fall as all rain Friday afternoon into Saturday. Over an inch of rain is likely.

Again, all of this forecast is subject to change depending on how this low develops and exactly where it tracks. A temperature change just by one to two degrees could drastically change conditions.

Stay tuned to News 14 Carolina and Weather on the Ones for the updates through the storm. We'll be staff around the clock to provide you with the latest information.

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Afternoon Update

Wednesday Morning Update on the Weekend Forecast

Some folks around Raleigh commented on the red sky this morning. News 14 Carolina viewer Jim Penny sent us a picture of that "red sunrise" this morning from west Raleigh. The old weather saying goes something like "red sky in the morning, take warning...." So is there warning we need to take from that red sky? There's certainly nothing to be warned about today and tomorrow and we look for clear and chilly conditions. However, by now you may have heard the buzz around town about the weekend forecast...

Through the rest of the week, we'll track low pressure out of the Gulf of Mexico across Florida and just off the southeast coast. If that low continues to track up the coastline of the Carolinas, central parts of North Carolina COULD see snow. The area of interest for this scenario includes points from Raleigh to Fayetteville and to the west. On the other hand, if the low continues to track to the east-northeast, our area would mainly just see some rain showers.

Computer models still give a variety of forecasts this morning, and it's really too early to start leaning one way or the other on those scenarios. The timing on the preciptiation remains uncertain as well. Our original timeframe of interest was late Friday night into Saturday. A few models now try to start the precipitation as early as Friday afternoon.

With each model run that comes out today and tomorrow, we should gain more confidence in the forecast. We should certainly have a better idea on what may happen by tomorrow and Friday. So stay tuned to see if we just see a cold rain or something more....

In the meantime, the folks over at the National Weather Service in Raleigh always do a great job with the difficult task of winter weather forecasting in central North Carolina. Here's their hazardous weather update this morning with more on their forecast thinking....


THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT.

HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...THURSDAY THROUGH TUESDAY.

COLD AND DRY HIGH PRESSURE WILL BUILD SOUTH INTO NORTH CAROLINA THURSDAY AND FRIDAY. A LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM IS EXPECTED TO DEVELOP OVER THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ON FRIDAY...TRACKING NORTHEAST ACROSS FLORIDA INTO THE ATLANTIC ON FRIDAY NIGHT AND SATURDAY.

IF THE LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM TRACKS CLOSE ENOUGH TO THE COAST... THERE WILL BE A CHANCE OF SNOW OR A RAIN AND SNOW MIX OVER THE CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA PIEDMONT. AT THIS TIME...A FAIR AMOUNT OF UNCERTAINTY REMAINS WITH RESPECT TO THE STRENGTH AND TRACK OF THIS LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM. CURRENT INDICATIONS ARE THAT THE STORM MAY PASS FAR ENOUGH TO OUR SOUTH AND EAST THAT SIGNIFICANT WINTRY PRECIPITATION WOULD NOT BE LIKELY. HOWEVER...IF THE STORM SYSTEM TRACKS CLOSER TO THE COAST...THE CHANCE FOR SIGNIFICANT WINTRY PRECIPITATION WOULD INCREASE.

EVERYONE IS ENCOURAGED TO STAY TUNED TO THE LATEST FORECASTS AND UPDATES THROUGH THE END OF THE WEEK INTO THE WEEKEND.

$$

BADGETT/VINCENT

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Watching the Weekend Forecast...

As of Tuesday morning, there is a lot of uncertainty in the forecast for the weekend. Low pressure is expected to track out of the Gulf of Mexico and perhaps just off the Carolina coast by the weekend. However, it is questionable now just how close to our coast that low will track, and that could impact our weather for Saturday and perhaps Sunday. For more on what we're watching for this weekend check out this morning's video blog posted below...

Monday, December 14, 2009

Foggy Monday Morning

News 14 Carolina viewer photo taken by Wendell Hull in Durham of Monday morning's dense fog. Send your weather pictures anytime to weather@news14.com.

Monday, December 07, 2009

Afternoon Update

Cold Monday Morning


Temperatures dipped into the upper 20s Monday morning making for a frosty start to the week. News 14 Carolina viewer Wendell Hull sent us this picture from his morning bike ride. The low dropped to 27 at the Raleigh-Durham Airport just below the normal of 34.

Ups and Downs Ahead This Week

Thursday, December 03, 2009

Wednesday's Rains


There's a picture from a News 14 Carolina viewer in Rocky Point, NC from yesterday's and last night's soaking rains. Most locations in central and eastern North Carolina saw anywhere between one and three inches of rain. The heavy rainfall created some minor flooding issues.

Even though our region spent part of the night under a Tornado Watch, severe weather damage was limited to isolated wind damage reports in Brunswick and Lenoir Counties.

Here's a look at some rainfall reports from around the News 14 Carolina viewing area:

  • Wilmington: 2.82"
  • Raleigh-Durham: 2.30"
  • Cherry Point: 2.02"
  • Jacksonville: 1.99"
  • Chapel Hill: 1.82"
  • Beaufort: 1.60"
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 1.58"
  • Goldsboro: 1.45"
  • New Bern: 1.40"
  • Fayetteville: 0.96"

Feel free to share your rain reports and weather pictures with us anytime by e-mailing weather@news14.com.

Wednesday, December 02, 2009

Update from the Storm Prediction Center...

PUBLIC SEVERE WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
0203 PM CST WED DEC 02 2009

...SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS EXPECTED OVER PARTS OF EASTERN SC AND NC THIS EVENING AND OVERNIGHT...

THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER IN NORMAN OK IS FORECASTING THE POSSIBLE DEVELOPMENT OF TORNADOES OVER EASTERN PARTS OF SC AND NC THIS EVENING AND OVERNIGHT.

CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED TO SUPPORT THE POTENTIAL FOR A FEW STRONG AND POSSIBLY LONG-LIVED TORNADOES.

WHILE OVERALL SEVERE THUNDERSTORM COVERAGE IS NOT EXPECTED TO BE WIDESPREAD...THE POTENTIAL FOR A SIGNIFICANT TORNADO AFTER DARK WARRANTS HEIGHTENED SAFETY PRECAUTIONS.

TORNADOES DURING THE OVERNIGHT HOURS AT THIS TIME OF YEAR CAN BE PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS BECAUSE THEY ARE USUALLY FAST-MOVING AND OBSCURED BY RAIN AND DARKNESS.

THE AREAS MOST LIKELY TO EXPERIENCE THIS ACTIVITY INCLUDE

EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
EASTERN SOUTH CAROLINA

STATE AND LOCAL EMERGENCY MANAGERS ARE MONITORING THIS DEVELOPING SITUATION. THOSE IN THE THREATENED AREA ARE URGED TO REVIEW SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY RULES AND TO LISTEN TO RADIO...TELEVISION...AND NOAA WEATHER RADIO FOR POSSIBLE WATCHES...WARNINGS...AND STATEMENTS TONIGHT.

..RACY.. 12/02/2009

Update on Storm Threat for this Afternoon and Tonight


Weather conditions are coming together for severe weather to develop across the eastern half of North Carolina this afternoon and tonight. The greatest threat for strong to severe storms will come from Raleigh to the south and east including areas all the way to the coast. There may be a couple of rounds of severe weather starting with strong storms this afternoon across the coastal plain. Another round of severe storms is possible from the Triangle to eastern North Carolina later into the night. Storms may produce damaging winds and tornadoes.
Heavy rains will be possible across most of the state as well. Rainfall could range between one and three inches by tonight. This may lead to some isolated flooding problems.
The Weather on the Ones Forecast Center will be staffed around the clock today and tonight. Stay tuned for the latest weather information available every 10 mintues with Weather on the Ones.

Tuesday, December 01, 2009

Update on Wednesday's Storm Threat


From the National Weather Service Office in Raleigh --

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA.

.DAY ONE...THIS AFTERNOON AND TONIGHT.

HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...WEDNESDAY THROUGH MONDAY.

A POWERFUL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL DEVELOP OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO TONIGHT AND MOVE RAPIDLY NORTHEAST THROUGH THE TENNESSEE AND OHIO VALLEYS WEDNESDAY NIGHT. IN ADDITION TO HEAVY RAIN...DAMAGING WINDS AND ISOLATED TORNADOES WILL BE POSSIBLE WITH ANY THUNDERSTORMS THAT DEVELOP ACROSS CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA WEDNESDAY EVENING THROUGH THURSDAY MORNING. AT THIS TIME...THE SEVERE WEATHER THREAT APPEARS TO BE GREATEST BETWEEN 6 PM WEDNESDAY AND 3 AM THURSDAY.

SEVERE WEATHER CAN BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS AT NIGHT. STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO ALL HAZARDS OR OTHER LOCAL MEDIA FOR FURTHER DETAILS OR UPDATES ON THE POTENTIAL FOR SEVERE WEATHER WEDNESDAY NIGHT.

.SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT...

SKYWARN SPOTTER ACTIVATION MAY BE NEEDED WEDNESDAY EVENING. SPOTTERS SHOULD REPORT ANY SEVERE WEATHER THAT IS OBSERVED AT THEIR LOCATION.

$$


and from the National Weather Service Office in Wilmington --

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR SOUTHEAST NORTH CAROLINA AND
NORTHEAST SOUTH CAROLINA.

.DAY ONE...TONIGHT.

NO HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS EXPECTED AT THIS TIME.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...WEDNESDAY THROUGH MONDAY.

STRONG TO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE...MAINLY LATER AFTERNOON WEDNESDAY AND WEDNESDAY NIGHT. WIND DAMAGE AND TORNADOES ARE POSSIBLE. IN ADDITION...RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 1 TO 3 INCHES ARE EXPECTED. THIS AMOUNT OF RAIN WILL BE ENOUGH TO CAUSE WATER TO POND IN LOW-LYING AND POOR DRAINAGE AREAS. RIVERS WILL BE ON THE RISE LATE WEEK AND THROUGH THE WEEKEND.

THE SURF WILL BE ROUGH AND HIGHER THAN NORMAL AND THERE MAY BE SOME MINOR BEACH EROSION WEDNESDAY AND WEDNESDAY NIGHT.

TIDES WILL BE HIGHER THAN NORMAL AND MAY APPROACH MINOR COASTAL FLOOD THRESHOLDS AROUND HIGH TIDE THURSDAY AND FRIDAY MORNING.

.SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT...

SPOTTER ACTIVATION MAY BE REQUIRED WEDNESDAY AND WEDNESDAY NIGHT.

$$
RJD

Monday, November 30, 2009

Threat for Strong Storms Late Wednesday

From the National Weather Service Office in Raleigh --


THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT.

HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...TUESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY.

A STRONG LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL DEVELOP NEAR THE TEXAS AND LOUISIANA COAST TUESDAY NIGHT... AND MOVE NORTHEAST THROUGH THE TENNESSEE AND OHIO VALLEYS THROUGH WEDNESDAY NIGHT. RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF TWO TO THREE INCHES ARE EXPECTED ACROSS CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA WEDNESDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY NIGHT. IN ADDITION TO HEAVY RAIN... WINDS WILL INCREASE WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH WEDNESDAY NIGHT... AND GUSTS OVER 35 MPH ARE POSSIBLE. THERE IS A RISK OF STRONG DAMAGING WINDS AND ISOLATED TORNADOES WITH ANY THUNDERSTORMS THAT DEVELOP ACROSS THE AREA LATE WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH WEDNESDAY
NIGHT.

SEVERE WEATHER CAN BE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS AT NIGHT. LISTEN TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO OR OTHER LOCAL MEDIA AS THIS STORM SYSTEM APPROACHES.

$$

HARTFIELD

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Update on the Winter Outlook

NOAA's Climate Prediction Center released an update to their outlook for winter 2009-2010 this week, and there are no big changes to forecast for this winter. The Carolinas can expect a colder than normal winter with near normal to above normal precipitation.




Monday, November 16, 2009

Recap of Last Week's Storm


Coastal NC residents check on their boat after last week's storm system. Photo submitted by News 14 Carolina viewers David and Lisa Riggs of Straits in Carteret County.

Part of the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida dumped heavy rains across North Carolina. That was followed by a Nor'eastern that formed off the coast producing more rain and gusty winds.

The National Weather Service produced the following maps showing rainfall and peak wind gusts across the state:






Friday, November 13, 2009

Rainfall since Tuesday

As of 6am Friday --

  • Swansboro: 9.26"
  • Newport: 8.15"
  • Surf City: 7.55"
  • Greensboro: 6.59"
  • Jacksonville: 6.50"
  • New Bern: 6.35"
  • Elizabethtown: 6.15"
  • Greenville: 6.00"
  • Oxford-Henderson: 5.32"
  • Chapel Hill: 5.11"
  • Fayetteville: 4.64"
  • Goldsboro: 4.61"
  • Raleigh-Durham: 4.45"
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 4.24"
  • Wilmington: 4.15"
  • Charlotte: 3.60"

You can share rain totals from your neighborhood and your rain pictures by e-mailing us at weather@news14.com

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Rainfall Forecast for Thursday

Additional rainfall expected today (Thursday) from the National Weather Service Office in Raleigh...

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Rainfall Forecast from the NWS

Here's an updated look at the rainfall forecast across the southeast through Thursday from the National Weather Service --


Threat for Heavy Rain and Wind

The remnants of Tropical Storm Ida tracking to our south will interact with a front moving through North Carolina to produce heavy rains and gusty winds through midweek. Take an in-depth look at the rain and wind threat in this morning's video blog posted below.

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Viewer Picture


Neat viewer picture James in Durham sent us this morning of dew on the Hillandale Golf Course
If you ever have a weather photo you'd like to share with us, send it by e-mail to weather@news14.com!

Tracking Ida

Friday, October 23, 2009

Dry 2009 So Far in the Triangle....

This week's drought monitor places much of central North Carolina under a moderate drought. The rainfall deficit for Raleigh-Durham now stands at 9.34" for the year. If the Triangle does not see much rain over the next couple of months, 2009 may go down in the record books as one of the driest years on record. So far this year, RDU has measured 26.87" of rain. Compare that do the top 10 driest years for the Raleigh-Durham area since 1887:
  1. 1933: 29.33"
  2. 1921: 32.09"
  3. 1976: 33.71"
  4. 1930: 33.92"
  5. 1965: 34.42"
  6. 1940: 34.46"
  7. 1951: 34.52"
  8. 2001: 34.78"
  9. 1991: 35.46"
  10. 1968: 35.60"

One of the reason's the area is behind normal for rainfall this year is the lack of rainfall from any tropical systems. North Carolina picks up a large amount of its average rainfall during the summer from tropical systems that either directly impact the state or from moisture of remnant tropical systems that may impact southeastern United States. A quiet hurricane season will often lead to a drier than normal summer.

There is some evidence we'll be able to make up some of our over 9" deficit. The 6-10 day precipitation outlook from the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) forecasts above normal rainfall for North Carolina. The winter outlook from the CPC forecasts near normal precipitation across the southeast. It appears an El Nino weather pattern will impact conditions across the country this winter. Local research from the National Weather Service Office in Raleigh suggests North Carolina typically experiences above normal rainfall during an El Nino winter.

Thanks to the climate team at the National Weather Service Office in Raleigh for providing the information for today's blog post.

Monday, October 19, 2009

Cold Start to Monday Morning

Temperatures dipped into the 30s across parts of North Carolina early Monday with some frost. Here's a look at low temperatures from around the region --

  • Raleigh-Durham: 34
  • Laurinburg: 35
  • Southern Pines: 36
  • Henderson-Oxford: 37
  • Louisburg: 38
  • Chapel Hill: 39
  • Lumberton: 39
  • Wilson: 39
  • Elizabethtown: 40
  • Goldsboro: 40
  • Whiteville: 40
  • Fayetteville: 41
  • Kenansville: 41
  • Smithfield: 41
  • Jacksonville: 42
  • Wilmington: 42
  • New Bern: 43
  • Oak Island: 43
  • Beaufort: 44
  • Havelock: 44

Thursday, October 15, 2009

Cold Winter Ahead?

Colder than normal temperatures over the last couple of days have people asking about the long range forecast for the winter. Just in time to answer those questions, an updated winter outlook for December through February was released today by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center

The outlook calls for a colder than normal winter for North Carolina and much of the southeast....




and near normal preciptation in North Carolina this winter...


Keep in mind this is a forecast that is made several months in advance. In a winter that's on average colder than normal, there could still be period of mild weather. However, this and other long range forecasts have called for a cold winter 2009-2010.

It is really difficult to speculate if that means a snowy winter is on the way as well. Only time well really answer that question. On average, the Triangle sees about 7 inches of snowfall in a winter. Snowfall amounts during a winter can certainly vary though. Some years the area sees no snow at all. Then there was January 2000 when parts of the Triangle had over 20".

Meet the Weather Team at the Fair!

It's State Fair time again! The North Carolina State Fair opens October 15 and runs through October 25. If you're spending some time at the fair this year, be sure to stop by the Time Warner Cable and News 14 Carolina tent and say hello. Our tent is located near the Dorton Arena. Meteorologists, anchors, and sportscasters will be there during select times!

Here's when you can meet News 14 Carolina meteorologists at the fair --
  • Thursday, October 15 6pm - 9pm: Gary Stephenson
  • Friday, October 16 12pm - 3pm: Joshua McKinney
  • Saturday, October 17 11am - 2pm: Pati Darak
  • Monday, October 19 1pm - 4pm: Lee Ringer
  • Tuesday, October 20 1pm - 4pm: Lee Ringer
  • Friday, October 23 12pm - 3pm: Joshua McKinney
  • Saturday, October 24 9am - 12pm: Gary Stephenson

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Afternoon Update

No real surprises have taken place today across Central and Eastern North Carolina. We've been talking about a wetter and colder than average stretch of days beginning today through the end of the week. So far, that's on track.

I would agree it's a shock to the system to go from wearing shorts and t-shirts to sweaters and coats in as little as 24 hours! Rainfall totals have been light with RDU International showing 0.06" and Fayetteville with 0.07" since Wednesday morning. These totals will move higher as we go through the next several days, but I think we'll avoid any major flooding concerns.

Here are a couple of interesting images I've gathered...



This is an overall look at what's happening at the surface. Winds are blowing out of the Northeast dropping temperatures into the upper 40s from the Triangle north and low 50s in the Sandhills! The cold air wedge has returned to the region and will persist tonight into tomorrow before weakening by Friday. Now, I'm not saying we'll be done with the rain, but temperatures should rebound just a little bit by the end of the week.

This second image is from the visible satellite of the Carolinas. What we're seeing is exactly what you and I are looking at, just from opposite sides. On the ground we're looking at the belly of a thick blanket of clouds with showers, but from up top we see just how much real estate is being consumed by clouds this Wednesday.

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Added Thoughts....

Great blog post from Lee Ringer earlier this morning alerting us to a wetter and COLDER period as we head toward the weekend! I wanted to post some images to show how much rain is possible as well as how cool it may be by Friday. I agree that it's going to look and feel a lot like winter time around here Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday in Central and Eastern North Carolina.


What you're seeing here is possible rainfall totals from Wednesday through Friday. There's a good bet the Deep South is looking at another round of flooding from Central Georgia into Northern Mississippi. Specifically for North Carolina the Sandhills to the Coast is in line for the heaviest rain and may receive upwards to an inch or two before weeks end. This will go a long way in denting the drought for the state.

This secondary map gives an indication of afternoon readings we can expect through the second half of the week especially for Friday. If you look at RDU it shows a high in the mid to upper 40s! The last time RDU recorded afternoon highs in the 40s was March 25th of this year. It may not be until early next week before highs return to the low 70s.

Big Weather Changes Ahead!

While you enjoy the sunny and warm afternoon today, you may want to find that winter coat you put away many months ago. Much colder and wet weather is on the way through the rest of the week. The Triangle is 8.5" behind in rainfall for the year, so the rain will be welcomed but it will come with temperatures that are more typical for January than mid-October.

Colder air will wedge its way into North Carolina tonight as a Canadian high pressure system builds to the north. At the same time, a wave of low pressure will track across the southeast. Cloudy conditions and rain from that wave of low pressure will overrun the colder air across the Carolinas. Wednesday morning with start with temperatures in the low 50s. As the rain sets in during the day, look for temperatures to drop into the mid to upper 40s in the afternoon across the Triangle and the upper 40s to near 50 in the Sandhills. The coast will gradually warm to near 60 and the low 60s.

The cloudy, cold and wet weather pattern likely won't change much through the rest of the week. Thursday will be cloudy with drizzle with more rain expected Friday. Once temperatures drop into the 40s Wednesday afternoon, they may not climb above the 40s until Saturday afternoon around the Triangle. The Sandhills may see see highs in the low 50s while the coast will be in the 50s for much of the day on Thursday and Friday.

Stay tuned to Weather on the Ones for the most updates on the big weather changes this week.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Tuesday's Rain Totals

Rain totals from across central and eastern NC Tuesday through early Wednesday morning...

  • Wilmington: 4.68"
  • Southern Pines: 4.13"
  • Durham: 3.23"
  • North Raleigh: 2.41"
  • Apex: 2.15"
  • Cary: 1.87"
  • Wake Forest: 1.52"
  • Raleigh-Durham Airport: 1.45"
  • Raleigh (NCSU Centennial Campus): 1.45"
  • Sunset Beach: 1.43"
  • Jacksonville: 1.20"
  • Goldsboro: 0.90"
  • Rocky Mt.- Wilson: 0.72"
  • Chapel Hill: 0.23"
  • Fayetteville: 0.20"
  • New Bern: 0.20"
  • Newport: 0.09"
  • Havelock: 0.04"
  • Beaufort: Trace
  • Harker's Island: Trace

Some rainfall totals courtesy of http://www.cocorahs.org/

Tuesday, September 08, 2009

Soggy Labor Day

A low pressure system tracking up the North Carolina coast made for a soggy weekend along the coast with some flooding reported around Pender County. Here's a look at some rain totals from around the coast --

  • Surf City: 10.03"
  • Beaufort: 8.07"
  • Swansboro: 6.89"
  • Jacksonville: 4.79"
  • Wilmington: 1.14"

If you have rain totals from your community or weather pictures to share, send an e-mail to weather@news14.com.

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Tropical Update -- Tuesday Morning

The next tropical depression or tropical storm could be developing soon. Check out the latest on the tropics in this morning's video blog posted below...

Monday, August 17, 2009

Are You Prepared for Tropical Weather ?

We’ve gone from a quiet start to three named tropical systems for our 2009 hurricane season for our Atlantic basin over a very short period of time!

When meteorologists discuss wind speeds of tropical systems and their associated ‘categories’, we’re referring to the Saffir-Simpson wind scale which is used for storms in the Atlantic and eastern North and Central Pacific basins:

• Tropical Storm
Winds 39-73 mph
• Category 1 Hurricane — winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt)
No real damage to buildings. Damage to unanchored mobile homes. Some damage to poorly constructed signs. Also, some coastal flooding and minor pier damage.
- Examples: Irene 1999 and Allison 1995
• Category 2 Hurricane — winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt)
Some damage to building roofs, doors and windows. Considerable damage to mobile homes. Flooding damages piers and small craft in unprotected moorings may break their moorings. Some trees blown down.
- Examples: Bonnie 1998, Georges(FL & LA) 1998 and Gloria 1985
• Category 3 Hurricane — winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt)
Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings. Large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly built signs destroyed. Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by floating debris. Terrain may be flooded well inland.
- Examples: Keith 2000, Fran 1996, Opal 1995, Alicia 1983 and Betsy 1965
• Category 4 Hurricane — winds 131-155 mph (114-135 kt)
More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failure on small residences. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may be flooded well inland.
- Examples: Hugo 1989 and Donna 1960
• Category 5 Hurricane — winds 156 mph and up (135+ kt)
Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. Flooding causes major damage to lower floors of all structures near the shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas may be required.
- Examples: Andrew(FL) 1992, Camille 1969 and Labor Day 1935

While we do not have any tropical system-related watches or warnings at this moment for North Carolina at the moment, it never hurts to have some resources already in your arsenal to keep ahead of the storm:

News 14 Carolina and Weather on the Ones - always a great first start for updates on any changing situations. We are a 24-hour news station, so you can get news/weather information anytime. We have a number of links to the left of the home page, including one specifically for our hurricane season . A new feature on the Weather on the Ones page is our interactive radar . I’ve spent some time playing with it and I’m finding this to be very useful!

Also, Time Warner Cable subscribers can also access information via Carolina On Demand digital channel 1234. By selecting ' Hurricane Season' you can get a number of stories with information brought to you by your Weather on the Ones team of meteorologists to keep you ahead of the storm.


Links to Local / County government Emergency Management related sites - always useful for very localized information for you. Not only links you to various county and state emergency management agencies, but also to sites for NC Department of Transportation, the NC Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, and USACE North Carolina Storm Surge maps and information.

Ready North Carolina - a campaign via the NC Division of Emergency Management (part of the Department of Crime Control and Public Safety) that provides residents of North Carolina with necessary print/ video information in English and Spanish to prepare for all types of emergencies.

The website for the NC Department of Health, Safety and Human Services - provides links to many necessary services like the Red Cross and North Carolina State Animal Response Team (SART)

Finally, the NC Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources - provides daily situation reports when necessary.

Tropical Update -- Monday Morning

All of a sudden the tropics became very active over the weekend. Find out the latest on Ana, Bill, and Claudette in this morning's video blog posted below...

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Wednesday's Flooding Rains near the Coast








Strong storms dumped up to 10 inches of rain on parts of eastern North Carolina Wednesday afternoon. Rainfall amounts that are typically only seen during a tropical storm or hurricane were produced just by nearly stationary afternoon storms. The hardest hit area was in southern Craven County around Cherry Point and Havelock. News 14 Carolina viewer Courtney Jansen sent us the above photos near Lake Road in Havelock.
Here's a look at rainfall reports from Wednesday's storms:
  • Cherry Point: 10.00"
  • New Bern: 5.04"
  • Beaufort: 2.69"
  • Swansboro: 2.22"
  • Jacksonville: 1.79"
  • Wilmington: 0.76"

Localized heavy downpours will be possible again Thursday from storms that are expected to develop mainly during the afternoon hours. Stay tuned to News 14 Carolina and news14.com for weather updates through the day.

If you have weather reports or pictures of Wednesday's storms or any storms in the future, share them with us by e-mailing weather@news14.com.

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Today's Storm Chances and the Latest on the Tropics

Scattered thunderstorms are likely today across North Carolina. A few could become strong to severe. For the latest on the chance for strong storms, an update on Tropical Depression #2, and an update on another system we're watching in the tropics, check out this morning's video blog.

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Update on the Tropics

Tropical Depression #2 formed early Tuesday morning near the coast of Africa. For more on the forecast for the tropics, check out this morning's video blog posted below...

Monday, August 10, 2009

How to recognize heat-related illness

Heat illnesses are easily preventable by taking precautions in hot weather.

According to the National Institutes of Health, children, elderly, and obese people have a higher risk of developing heat illness. People taking certain medications or drinking alcohol also have a higher risk. However, even a top athlete in superb condition can succumb to heat illness if he or she ignores the warning signs.

If the problem isn't addressed, heat cramps (caused by loss of salt from heavy sweating) can lead to heat exhaustion (caused by dehydration), which can progress to heatstroke. Heatstroke, the most serious of the three, can cause shock, brain damage, organ failure, and even death.

The following are common causes of heat emergencies:
Alcohol use
Dehydration
Heart disease
High temperatures or humidity
Certain medications
Prolonged or excessive exercise
Sweat gland problems
Too much clothing


You most at risk doing work or activities in a hot environment-usually during the first few days of an activity you're not used to. You are also at risk if you sweat a great deal during exercise and don't drink enough or drink large amounts of fluids that lack salt.


This is by no means a substitute for medical advice. As with all other medical problems, a doctor should be called if you are not sure what is wrong, if you do not know what to do for the problem, or if the person is not responding to what you are doing for them. Please seek the advice of a physician or emergency room should you feel you have placed yourself at risk for heat-related illness.

Heat cramps:
are muscle pains or spasms - usually in the abdomen, shoulders, arms, or legs - that may occur in association with strenuous activity in a hot environment. Cramping may also be delayed and occur a few hours later

If you have heart problems or are on a low sodium diet, get medical attention for heat cramps.

What to Do:

• Stop all activity, and sit quietly in a cool place.
• Drink clear juice or a sports beverage.
• Do not return to strenuous activity for a few hours after the cramps subside because further exertion may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
• Seek medical attention for heat cramps if they do not subside in 1 hour.

Call your doctor if these conditions develop:

• If you are unable to drink sufficient fluids because you have nausea or are vomiting, you may need IV rehydration with normal saline.
• If you have more severe symptoms of heat illness, including dizziness, fatigue, vomiting, headache, malaise, shortness of breath, and high temperatures (greater than 104°F), seek medical care.
• If you have more severe forms of heat illness or think you require IV fluids to rehydrate, seek care at a hospital's emergency department.

Heat exhaustion:
This condition often occurs when people exercise (work or play) in a hot, humid place and body fluids are lost through sweating, causing the body to overheat. The person's temperature may be elevated, but not above 104°F.
Heat exhaustion is typically caused when people who are not well adjusted to heat exercise in a hot, humid environment.
At high temperatures, the body cools itself largely through evaporation of sweat.
When it is very humid, this mechanism does not work properly.
The body loses a combination of fluids and salts (electrolytes).
When this is accompanied by an inadequate replacement of fluids, disturbances in the circulation may result that are similar to a mild form of shock.


Heat exhaustion symptoms:

Often pale with cool, moist skin
Sweating profusely
Muscle cramps or pains
Feels faint or dizzy
May complain of headache, weakness, thirst, and nausea

The physicians writing for the website WebMD continue to advise that for heat exhaustion, a person should go to the hospital if any of the following are present:
Loss of consciousness, confusion, or delirium
Chest or abdominal pain
Inability to drink fluids
Continuous vomiting
Temperature more than 104°F which may be combined with an increasing pulse
Temperature that is rising despite attempts to cool the person
Any person with other serious ongoing medical problems


Heat stroke: This medical condition is life-threatening.
The person's cooling system, which is controlled by the brain, stops working and the internal body temperature rises to the point where brain damage or damage to other internal organs may result (temperature may reach 105+°F).
Heat stroke may often develop rapidly.
Medical conditions or medications that impair the body's ability to sweat may predispose people to this problem.
According to the website Medicinenet.com, heat stroke happens in the following two ways:
The classic form occurs in people whose cooling mechanisms are impaired.
The form caused by exertion occurs in previously healthy people who are undergoing strenuous activity in a hot environment.

*Infants and the elderly are more likely to have this problem, as are those who are taking antihistamines and certain types of medication for high blood pressure or depression.

Call a doctor for heat exhaustion if the person is unable to keep fluids down or if their mental status begins to deteriorate. Symptoms of shortness of breath, chest pain, or abdominal pain may indicate that the heat exhaustion is accompanied by more serious medical problems.

According to WebMD: A person with suspected heat stroke should always go to the hospital (or call for an ambulance) at once.


Heat stroke symptoms:
Unconscious or has a markedly abnormal mental status (dizziness, confusion, hallucinations, or coma)
Flushed, hot, and dry skin (although it may be moist initially from previous sweating or from attempts to cool the person with water)
May have slightly elevated blood pressure at first that falls later
May be hyperventilating
May be experiencing convulsions
Rectal (core) temperature of 105°F or more

Suspected heat stroke is a true, life-threatening medical emergency. Call for an ambulance and request information as to what to do until the ambulance arrives.

Saturday, August 08, 2009

Try to keep the fun inside for a time this weekend..

Some of you are already flirting with high temperatures this weekend, and those 'feels like' temperatures that are over 100 degrees!
In some cases, the combination of heat and humidity (what creates the 'heat index' ) is driving the index to over 105-degrees. At that point, the National Weather Service issues a heat advisory.
A heat advisory is issued within 12 hours of the onset of the following conditions: heat index ('feels like ' temperature) of at least 105°F but less than 115°F for less than 3 hours per day, or nighttime lows above 80°F for 2 consecutive days.

In this weekend's case for the Nation's heartland and for some areas in North Carolina, we're dealing with about a 2-day threat of taxing temperatures.

According to the National Weather Service, heat kills by taxing the human body beyond its abilities. In a normal year, about 175 Americans succumb to the demands of summer heat. Human bodies dissipate heat by varying the rate and depth of blood circulation, by losing water through the skin and sweat glands, and as a last resort, by panting, when blood is heated above 98.6°F. Sweating, by itself, does nothing to cool the body, unless the water is removed by evaporation. High relative humidity retards evaporation.

Heat disorders generally have to do with a reduction or collapse of the body's ability to shed heat by circulatory changes and sweating. When heat gain exceeds the level the body can remove, the temperature of the body's inner core begins to rise and heat related illnesses may develop.

As a result, the "Heat Index" (HI) has been developed. The HI is the temperature the body feels when heat and humidity are combined. The table below correlates the actual temperature and relative humidity, producing a HI. (This chart is based upon shady, light wind conditions. Exposure to full sunshine can increase the HI by up to 15°F.)

Here's the basics of what you need to know:














(courtesy: NWS Louisville)

Any value less than 80 is considered comfortable.
Any value greater than 90 is considered extreme.
Any value greater than 100 is considered hazardous.
Any value greater than 110 is considered dangerous.

When the heat index is forecast to be:
80°F to 90°F : Fatigue is possible with prolonged exposure and physical activity.

90°F to 105°F : Sunstroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion is possible.

105°F to 130°F : Sunstroke, heat cramps, and heat exhaustion are likely, and
heatstroke possible.

and while we're not expecting heat indices of this magnitude, I still included the top of the scale:
130°F or greater : Heat stroke highly likely with continued exposure.


You already know about keeping cool. The basics for dealing with the heat include drinking plenty of fluids…stay in an air-conditioned room…stay out of the sun…and check up on relatives and neighbors. Bring pets indoors and provide plenty of water for them as well.

Here's also a couple of links with more information:
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/faq.asp

http://www.nia.nih.gov/HealthInformation/Publications/hyperthermia.htm

Your Weather on the Ones forecast center will keep you up to date if any advisories are issued or extended for your area. Your latest 7-day forecast for North Carolina is available at news14.com

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Viewer Picture

A News 14 Carolina viewer sent us this beautiful shot taken from Oak Island on Thursday. If you ever have a weather picture to share with us, e-mail us at weather@news14.com. We may feature your photo on news14.com or even use it during Weather on the Ones!

Thursday's Storm Chances and an Update on the Tropics

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Isolated Storm Possible Tuesday Afternoon

After an afternoon of widespread storms yesterday, we could see a few isolated storms today. Find out more in this morning's video blog posted below...

Monday, July 27, 2009

Sunday, July 26, 2009

Smoke reducing visibilities in western Carteret county this afternoon

Special Weather Statement
SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEWPORT/MOREHEAD CITY NC
1115 AM EDT SUN JUL 26 2009

NCZ092-093-095-098-262200-
JONES-CRAVEN-CARTERET-ONSLOW-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...MAYSVILLE...POLLOCKSVILLE...NEW BERN...
HAVELOCK...MOREHEAD CITY...BEAUFORT...EMERALD ISLE...NEWPORT...
JACKSONVILLE
1115 AM EDT SUN JUL 26 2009

...SMOKE WILL REDUCE VISIBILITIES OVER WESTERN CARTERET COUNTY
THIS AFTERNOON...

SMOKE FROM A BURNOUT OPERATION ON THE CAROLINA BAY WILDFIRE NEAR
MILLIS ROAD IN WESTERN CARTERET COUNTY WILL PRODUCE REDUCED
VISIBILITIES IN THE AREA THIS AFTERNOON. THE HEAVIEST SMOKE IS
EXPECTED ALONG NINE MILE ROAD AND ROBERTS ROAD JUST WEST OF
NEWPORT...AND VISIBILITIES COULD DROP BELOW 1 MILE AT TIMES.
CARTERET COUNTY EMERGENCY SERVICES REPORTS THAT NINE MILE ROAD
FROM HIGHWAY 24 WILL BE CLOSED TO TRAFFIC DUE TO THE EXPECTED
DENSE SMOKE.

MOTORISTS IN THE AREA ARE URGED TO BE ALERT FOR SUDDENLY REDUCED
VISIBILITIES THIS AFTERNOON AND POSSIBLY INTO TONIGHT. SLOW DOWN...
USE YOUR HEADLIGHTS...AND LEAVE PLENTY OF DISTANCE AHEAD OF YOU IN
CASE A SUDDEN STOP IS REQUIRED.

SOME ASH FALLING FROM THE SMOKE PLUME CAN BE EXPECTED NEAR
NEWPORT AND HAVELOCK AS WELL.

$$

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Unsettled Weather for the End of the Week

Scattered showers and storms are in the forecast for the next several days. Find out more about the unsettled weather for the end of the week including the threat for strong storms in this morning's video blog update posted below...

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Coastal rain totals from Monday

Here's a look at rainfall totals from around coastal North Carolina including some viewer reports --

Wilmington: 6.53" *
Ogden (Brittney Lakes area): 5.88"
Castle Hayne: 1.55"
Swansboro: 0.71"
Beaufort/Morehead City: 0.42"
Wallace: 0.26"
Havelock/Cherry Point: 0.13"
New Bern: 0.05"

* 6.51" of Wilmington's rain total fell before midnight. That 6.51" is the 14th highest rainfall on record for ILM. Records have been kept since 1871. The highest ever one day rainfall in Wilmington was 13.38" on September 15, 1999 during Hurricane Floyd.

E-mail your rainfall totals to weather@news14.com

Wilmington Flooding -- Monday, July 7

Here's a look at News 14 Carolina viewer photos from Monday night's flooding around Wilmington --



















Send your weather pictures anytime to weather@news14.com

Saturday, June 27, 2009

The UV Index..How Many Minutes Can You be Outside on a Sunny Day?



Courtesy National Weather Service, Wilmington, NC
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/ilm/beach/uv/mintoburn.shtml

During the course of our Weather on the Ones forecasts, we inform you of the UV index for the day and give you information regarding how many minutes you may have, on the average, until you might be at risk for a sunburn or skin damage.
Because it may take a shorter amount of time for some folks to burn due to skin type, I personally give the time thats more geared toward fairer-skinned types since thats at the shortest end of the time scale.

But what if you are *not* in that category? Well, that is why I have placed this chart from the National Weather Service (and its accompanying link) here for you.
Skin damage is still a risk for everyone in the summer months, but this way you can get a better idea of how long you can be outside before having to re-apply sunscreen, cover up, or get to some shade!

There is also some great information provided by the EPA : http://www.epa.gov/sunwise/actionsteps.html this site has action steps you can take to keep your skin safer in the sun, and a widget for your homepage that can give you the UV index for your particular zip code: http://www.epa.gov/sunwise/uviresources.html

The UV index outlook for NC this last weekend of June: in the high range, which means for fairer-skinned types, about 10-15 minutes outside without sunscreen before you'll put yourself at risk for skin damage.

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

2009 Hurricane Season: Quiet, So Far...

We are now almost a month into the 2009 hurricane season. So far, there has not been much activity in the Atlantic Basin, but that is not all that unusual. Find out more in today's video blog posted below...

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Tuesday Evening

Viewer Video

A News 14 Carolina viewer just north of Greensboro recently shared this nice time lapse video taken last week. Check it out below.



If you ever have weather video or pictures to share with us, send us an e-mail to weather@news14.com. You may see your video or pictures on Weather on the Ones or on news14.com!

Monday, June 22, 2009

Sunday, June 21, 2009

Lightning Safety..Knowledge for Your Summertime Safety


Photo courtesy of: NOAA Photo Library, NOAA Central Library; OAR/ERL/National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL)

Welcome to Summer!..Its Lightning Safety Awareness Week...

Summer is the peak time to enjoy the outdoors, but it is also the peak time for exposing oneself to the dangers of lightning. At any given moment, there are 1,800 thunderstorms in progress somewhere on the earth. This amounts to 16 million storms each year! Each spark of lightning can reach over five miles in length, soar to temperatures of approximately 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit, and contain 100 million electrical volts.

As a storm forms, ice particles move about inside the cloud. The positively-charged crystals migrate to the top of the thunderstorm while you'll find the majority of negatively-charged particles near the bottom of the cloud. Lightning can originate from the top or the bottom of the cloud, and while you might not often hear the phrase 'negative lightning' during the course of our weather coverage, you will hear us use the phrase 'Positive lightning' when flashes, depicted with a purple lightning bolt, show up on our radar. You'll hear us say that positive lightning is particularly dangerous.

Positive lightning is particularly dangerous for several reasons. It frequently strikes away from the rain core, either ahead or behind the thunderstorm. It can strike as far as 5 or 10 miles from the storm, in areas that most people do not consider to be a lightning risk area. The other problem with positive lightning is it typically has a longer duration, so fires are more easily ignited. Positive lightning usually carries a high peak electrical current, which increases the lightning risk to an individual.

I'm a huge fan of the research done by Dr. Mary Ann Cooper of the University of Illinois (Bio: http://www.uic.edu/labs/lightninginjury/macbio.htm ). She has managed to find differences in the way lightning injures a person versus direct or alternating electrical current exposure. She has also identified particular ways that lightning can injure an individual. Knowledge of these differences by an emergency physician can make a difference, especially if you are unable to speak for yourself after being injured by lightning.

She cites 6 ways by which lightning may injure an individual:

1) Direct strike (approximately 3-5% of injuries)
2) Side splash from another object (approximately 30% of injuries)
3) Contact voltage from touching an object that is struck (approximately 1-2% of injuries)
4) Ground current effect as the energy spreads out across the surface of the earth when lightning hits a distance away from the person (approximately 40-50% of injuries)
5) Upward leader that does not connect with the downward leader to complete a lightning channel (approximately 20-25% of injuries)
6) Blunt trauma if a person is thrown and barotrauma from being close enough to experience the explosive force of lightning


I'll post a link to some of her work here. Some of it is of course quite complex, but it may give you an appreciation for why we urge you to get to a place of safety when lightning moves into your area.

A sample of links to Dr. Cooper:
http://www.uic.edu/labs/lightninginjury/macbio.htm
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/770642-overview


Here is the link to the National Weather Service website for Lightning Safety Awareness Week:
http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2009/20090617_lightning.html

Here are some additional websites so that you can research lightning on your own!
Global Hydrology and and Climate Center.. http://thunder.msfc.nasa.gov/

National Geographic Lightning Page: http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/lightning-profile.html

National Weather Service Lightning Safety: http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/pdfs/LightningMyths-1.pdf

National Weather Service Photo Library:
http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/nssl/lightning1.html

Friday, June 19, 2009

Records to Watch this Weekend

With temperatures soaring well into the 90s this weekend, we may come close to record high temperatures. Saturday is the mostly like day to tie or break a record when afternoon temperatures may reach near 100.

Raleigh-Durham Record Highs
  • Friday, June 19 - 102 (1944)
  • Saturday, June 20 - 99 (1964)
  • Sunday, June 21 - 99 (1964)

Wilmington Record Highs

  • Friday, June 19 - 98 (1984)
  • Saturday, June 20 - 99 (1924)
  • Sunday, June 21 - 101 (1990)

Thursday, June 18, 2009

The heat is on !

Hot and humid conditions are expected Friday and Saturday. Temperatures are likely to top out in the mid to upper 90s, and when combined with high humidity, will produce heat index ('what it feels like') values in the upper 90s to near 100-degrees.
People across North Carolina should take precautions to protect themselves, their animals and their neighbors from the heat. This includes staying in / providing a well-ventilated shady area or in air conditioning as much as possible. Drink or provide extra water , and minimize outdoor activities in the afternoon and early evening when temperatures will be hottest.

The ASPCA and other sites have provided information especially for your pets.. available at this link:

http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/summer_care_tips_for_you_and_your_pets/
http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-care-tips/hot-weather-tips.html
http://www.thecatsite.com/Care/9/Keeping-Cats-Cool.html
http://horses.about.com/od/basiccare/qt/keepcool.htm


I have also provided a 'hot weather' search link with the NC State University Cooperative extension Service. You can find a lot of useful information through your state cooperative extension offices. Here's the NC State link:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/search/search.php?restrict=www&q=hot+weather+

..and here is a link to the Cooperative Extension Service site for the US..you can click on your state and find information for your specific area:
http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/


We'll be monitoring for the chance of strong to severe weather tonight and will provide the latest information on forecasted temperatures throughout Father's Day weekend. Tune in to News 14 Carolina and to news14.com

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Triangle Area Flooding -- Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Heavy downpours Tuesday morning led to swollen creeks and flooded roadways across the Triangle. Some of the heaviest rain fell across Wake County including areas around Cary, Raleigh, and Garner. Here's a look at some of the scenes around those areas submitted by News 14 Carolina viewers.









As of 1pm, here's a look at rain totals around the region --
  • Lake Wheeler (south of downtown Raleigh): 4.65"
  • Clayton: 3.84"
  • Reedy Creek (near Raleigh): 2.84"
  • Goldsboro: 2.01"
  • Raleigh-Durham Airport: 0.41"
  • Chapel Hill: 0.12"


See flooding video and check out more viewer pictures on news14.com. Just click to http://www.news14.com/content/top_stories/610746/rains-causing-traffic-nightmares--forces-residents-out/Default.aspx

Send us your weather pictures anytime to weather@news14.com