Monday, December 29, 2008

Record Highs Sunday!

Sunshine prevailed Sunday and temperatures were able to climb to levels that either tied or broke records. Raleigh-Durham International recorded a high of 74 degrees, tying a record set 20 years earlier. Wilmington reached afternoon highs of 76 which also tied a record. The last time it got that warm on December 28th was in 1971.
North Myrtle Beach saw a new record high! 70 was the high yesterday, breaking the old record of 68 from 1954. Finally, New Bern reached a new record high on Sunday just after 2pm of 77-degrees. That broke the old record of 76 that had been in the books since 1971.
Temperatures this week will not reach record levels as we'll have a series of cold fronts cross over NC. We'll also have a change in our upper-level jet stream pattern ..that also has an effect on our temperatures. We had an upper-level ridge pattern over the SE United States which meant mild temperatures for us. This week we're dominated by a more zonal flow which is a west-to-east flow. That generally means temps that are closer to normal (our normal highs for the end of December are lower 50s for the Triangle region, mid to upper-50s along the coast). We'll get a shot of cold air as we get into the new year! Check out your Weather on the Ones Forecast at http://www.news14.com

Friday, December 12, 2008

Rainfall since Wednesday

Here's a look at rainfall around central and eastern North Carolina since Wednesday. (Most of the rain fell Thursday) --
  • New Bern: 2.52"
  • Havelock: 2.40"
  • Wilmington: 1.82"
  • Chapel Hill: 1.81"
  • Fayetteville: 1.65"
  • Raleigh-Durham: 1.55"
  • Jacksonville: 1.42"
  • Goldsboro: 1.19"
  • Rocky Mount-Wilson: 1.17"
  • Beaufort: 0.91"

Much of central and eastern North Carolina spent Thursday afternoon under Tornado Watches. A few Tornado Warnings were evening issued. Fortunately, there were no reports of any tornado touchdowns and no reports of any storm damage.

We expect quieter and cooler weather through the weekend with a warm up to start early next week.

Thursday, December 11, 2008

Afternoon Storm Threat

It has been a busy morning so far in the Weather on the Ones Forecast Center, and it looks to only get busier this afternoon. As I write this post just after 10 am this morning, the Storm Prediction Center is closely monitoring the Carolinas and a Tornado Watch may soon be posted for a large part of South Carolina and central and eastern North Carolina. A Severe Thunderstorm Watch may also be posted over the western Carolinas. If that happens, will have the latest advisories every 10 minutes on News 14 Carolina.


Today's stormy weather is the result of a potent low pressure system that developed over the Gulf of Mexico late last night and early this morning. This has been quite the storm already producing strong storms near the Gulf coast this morning and even snow in places like Houston, Texas and New Orleans, Louisiana.

Snowfall on freeway near New Orleans.

Snowfall on Bourbon Street in New Orleans this morning.

We do not anticipate winter weather here, but severe weather will be a threat as the low tracks across the Carolinas this afternoon. It now appears the worst of the weather may pass through our area between 2pm and 8pm. The severe weather threat includes heavy rains, damaging winds, and tornadoes.

If severe weather strikes this afternoon, do you know where you will seek shelter? Identify that location now so you can get there at a moment's notice. The safest place to be during a severe thunderstorm or tornado is in the center of a sturdy building on the lowest floor away from windows. You will want to put as many walls as you can between you and the outside. Large open buildings such as gyms and auditoriums do not provide enough protection. The safest places are usually basements, closets, hallways, or interior bathrooms.

Stay tuned to News 14 Carolina for the very latest on what could be a rapidly changing weather afternoon. We'll provide updates on our blog and through our Twitter updates as time allows. The most current information is available every 10 minutes with Weather on the Ones only on Time Warner Cable channel 14.

If severe weather happens in your neighborhood, you can e-mail us your storm reports and pictures when it is safe to do so to weather@news14.com.

Follow us on Twitter --

Hazardous Weather Update

Here's the latest update this morning on today's severe weather threat from the Raleigh National Weather Service Office....



HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RALEIGH NC
634 AM EST THU DEC 11 2008


NCZ007>010-021>026-038>041-073>077-083>086-088-121145-PERSON-GRANVILLE-VANCE-WARREN-FORSYTH-GUILFORD-ALAMANCE-ORANGE-DURHAM-FRANKLIN-DAVIDSON-RANDOLPH-CHATHAM-WAKE-STANLY-MONTGOMERY-MOORE-LEE-HARNETT-ANSON-RICHMOND-SCOTLAND-HOKE-CUMBERLAND-
634 AM EST THU DEC 11 2008

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON...

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT.

PLEASE LISTEN TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO OR GO TO WEATHER.GOV ON THE INTERNET FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE FOLLOWING HAZARDS.

FLASH FLOOD WATCH.

A STRONG LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM IS EXPECTED TO TRACK NORTHEASTWARD ACROSS NORTHERN GEORGIA AND THE CAROLINAS THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING. RAIN IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE IN COVERAGE AND INTENSITY AHEAD OF THE LOW PRESSURE THROUGH TODAY. THE HEAVIEST RAIN IS EXPECTED TO OCCUR ALONG AND NORTH OF THE INTERSTATE FORTY AND EIGHTY FIVE CORRIDOR FROM THE TRIAD TO HENDERSON AND ROXBORO....WHERE TWO TO THREE INCHES OF RAIN WILL BE COMMON. LESSERAMOUNTS... GENERALLY ONE TO TWO INCHES... ARE EXPECTED TO THE SOUTH AND EAST OF THESE AREAS. THE RAINFALL MAY RESULT IN FLASH FLOODING... PARTICULARLY NEAR CREEKS AND STREAMS AND IN URBAN AREAS.

IN ADDITION... WARM AND MOIST AIR COUPLED WITH STRONG... TURNING WINDS ALOFT IN ADVANCE OF THE LOW PRESSURE WILL CREATE A FAVORABLE ENVIRONMENT FOR SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS TO DEVELOP LATER THIS AFTERNOON INTO EARLY THIS EVENING. DAMAGING STRAIGHT LINE WINDS AND A FEW TORNADOES WILL BE THE MAIN THREATS FROM THESE THUNDERSTORMS. THE SEVERE WEATHER THREAT WILL BE HIGHEST FROM AROUND 1 PM TO 8PM.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...FRIDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY.

HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS NOT EXPECTED AT THIS TIME..

SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT..

.SKYWARN SPOTTER ACTIVATION WILL LIKELY BE NEEDED LATER TODAY AND THIS EVENING. SPOTTERS SHOULD REPORT SEVERE WEATHER AS SOON AS IT IS SAFE TO DO SO.

PLEASE STAY TUNED FOR POSSIBLE WATCHES AND WARNINGS.

$$

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Strong to Severe Storms Possible...

A Flash Flood Watch is en effect for much of the News 14 Carolina viewing area this evening and much of Thursday.

Flash Flood Watch Link

Severe storm threat ramps up dramatically overnight tonight and into Thursday as an area of low pressure heads towards the Carolinas. Instability, low level winds, and many parameters are coming together to allow for a 1-2 punch of severe storms. I'm concerned the first threat will come from strong storms moving on-shore that would impact the Coast and Coastal Plain. The second threat will come from a line of storms crossing the entire viewing area ahead of a cold front. It's safe to say I'd check in with the Weather on the Ones Forecast Center tonight before heading to bed and maybe leaving the weather radio on overnight tonight.

Day 1 Outlook

Day 2 Outlook

Hazardous Weather Outlook

Here's the latest on the storm threat over the next couple of days as outlined in this morning's Hazardous Weather Outlook from the Raleigh National Weather Service --

HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RALEIGH NC
349 AM EST WED DEC 10 2008

NCZ007>011-021>028-038>043-073>078-083>086-088-089-110900-
PERSON-GRANVILLE-VANCE-WARREN-HALIFAX-FORSYTH-GUILFORD-ALAMANCE-ORANGE-DURHAM-FRANKLIN-NASH-EDGECOMBE-DAVIDSON-RANDOLPH-CHATHAM-WAKE-JOHNSTON-WILSON-STANLY-MONTGOMERY-MOORE-LEE-HARNETT-WAYNE-ANSON-RICHMOND-SCOTLAND-HOKE-CUMBERLAND-SAMPSON-
349 AM EST WED DEC 10 2008

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT.

A SQUALL LINE OF HEAVY SHOWERS WITH A FEW THUNDERSTORMS IS EXPECTED TO MOVE INTO THE WESTERN PIEDMONT LATE THIS AFTERNOON AND PUSH EAST... EXITING CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA NEAR MIDNIGHT. THERE WILL BE A POTENTIAL FOR ISOLATED STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE WITH THIS LINE. AN ISOLATED TORNADO CAN NOT BE RULED OUT.

RESIDENTS ARE URGED TO STAY CONNECTED TO LOCAL RADIO...TELEVISION... WEATHER RADIO OR OTHER MEDIA THIS EVENING AND TONIGHT UNTIL THE THREAT PASSES.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...THURSDAY THROUGH TUESDAY.

A SURFACE LOW IS FORECAST TO DEVELOP ON THE GULF COAST TONIGHT AND STRENGTHEN AS IT TRACKS NORTHEAST ACROSS THE CAROLINAS ON THURSDAY. NEAR AND EAST OF WHERE THE LOW TRACKS...THE COMBINATION OF A WARM AND UNSTABLE AIR MASS AND STRONG LIFT WILL RESULT IN THE POTENTIAL FOR STRONG TO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS THURSDAY. THE PRIMARY SEVERE WEATHER THREATS WILL BE DAMAGING WINDS AND ISOLATED TORNADOES.

RESIDENTS ARE URGED TO STAY CONNECTED TO LOCAL RADIO... TELEVISION...WEATHER RADIO OR OTHER MEDIA THROUGHOUT THE DAY THURSDAY UNTIL THE THREAT PASSES.

.SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT...

SKYWARN SPOTTERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO REPORT ANY SEVERE OR SIGNIFICANT WEATHER ASSOCIATED WITH THESE STORMS.
$$

Saturday, December 06, 2008

Windy and colder Sunday

Today is the conclusion of Winter Weather Awareness Week in North Carolina.
Here is the final link to the National Weather Service's series about preparedness for the season:

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/news/content/Winter_08_SATURDAY.pdf

An upper level disturbance will pair up with a dissipating cold front to bring us an increas in clouds for this afternoon and evening. We'll also see a possibility of snow flurries and passing moisture tries to work itself to the ground through dry air at the surface. When moisture encounters dry air it evaporates. Temperatures fall because that evaporation cools the air. So if any precipitation does make its way to ground level, we could see either patchy drizzle or flurries depending on our temperatures this afternoon and evening.

High pressure moving into the region late tonight into tomorrow will encounter an intensifying low off the East coast, so we'll expect gusty winds since we're in the middle of those systems. If you spent a lot of time putting out holiday decorations, make sure you secure them before bed tonight, as winds will blow in from the north at about 10-15mph with higher gusts tonight and Sunday morning!
Sunshine will dominate the day Sunday as will breezy conditions. Winds will still blow at about 10-15mph but we'll see fewer gusts as the day goes on. Highs in the 40s will feel much colder than that due to wind chill.
Sunday night will have clear to mostly clear skies and light winds which means we'll have a very cold start to the day Monday. Out-the-door temps for the morning commute are expected to be in the mid to upper 20s!
Wilmington's Christmas Parade is Sunday! Hope to see you there!

Have a great rest of your weekend.

Friday, December 05, 2008

NC Snow Climatology

This week has been Winter Weather Preparedness week in North Carolina. Yesterday I wrote about fire dangers in the home and provided links to the National Weather Service information from earlier this week.

I'm a little limited on time this afternoon, so I have enclosed the link directly to the National Weather Service information on today's subject. I'll have the concluding information for this week on this blog tomorrow (Saturday).

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/news/content/Winter_08_FRIDAY.pdf

Wilmington Christmas parade is this Sunday..if you're attending, look for me and for our Chief Meteorologist Gary Stephenson in the lineup! Gary made the decorations for our News 14 Carolina vehicle, so be sure to tell him how much you like it!

Thursday, December 04, 2008

Winter Weather Preparedness

This week is Winter Weather Preparedness Week in North Carolina and today we're not talking about winter weather directly but how winter temperatures can affect the safety of your home.
The following information is provided courtesy of the National Weather Service, The American Red Cross and the National Fire Protection Association. Its no secret that Americans see a higher number of house fires once the mercury takes a tumble. As a matter of fact, statistics show that a house fire is reported to a fire department in the US every one and a half minutes. Someone dies in a house fire every two and a half hours.
Structure fires claimed nearly 3000 lives in 2007 across the United States and 84 percent of those fires occurred in the home.

There are a number of other statistics provided, and I'll provide the link here to the National Weather Service report: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/news/content/Winter_08_THURSDAY.pdf

What you need to walk away with today are some common sense reminders of measures you can take to minimize the chance and impact of fire.
Again, from the National Weather Service report:
1) Be careful when using candles and oil lamps, especially with children nearby.
2) Inspect foreplaces, wood stoves and your chimney.
3) Keep the holiday decorations away from your fireplace if you plan to use it as a heat source.
4) Check the smoke detector and have a working fire extinguisher (Do you know how to use yours in a pinch?).
5) Don't overload your outlets and be careful when using extension cords.

Here's a list of this week's information on winter preparedness (through today..I'll post Friday's link tomorrow) from the National Weather Service:

Sunday: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/news/content/Winter_08_SUNDAY.pdf
Monday: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/news/content/Winter_08_MONDAY.pdf
Tuesday: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/news/content/Winter_08_TUESDAY.pdf
Wednesday:http://www.erh.noaa.gov/rah/news/content/Winter_08_WEDNESDAY.pdf

Still to cover this week: how to prepare when winter weather comes this way and the factor of winter weather that makes everyone an equal on the road: freezing rain and sleet.

Wednesday, December 03, 2008

Afternoon Update

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Twitter Updates


If you have checked our blog over the past several days, you may have noticed our new Twitter updates on the upper right side of the page. This will provide us a way to provide quick updates when there is not time for a complete blog post or a complete post is not needed. Twitter will also allow you to interact with us during times of active weather such as severe weather or snow. If you use Twitter, be sure to follow us and stay tuned for the latest.

Again, you'll find my Twitter updates on the upper right side of the blog or through this direct link -- http://twitter.com/LeeRingerNews14

Monday, November 24, 2008

Friday's Snow

Snow flurries and snow showers fell across parts of North Carolina early this past Friday morning. Here's a look at some viewer photos sent to the Weather on the Ones Forecast Center.

The most snow fell across portions of Triad as shown in this photo from a viewer in Stoneville--

Around the Triangle, just enough snow fell for a light dusting on some cars as shown by these photos from a News 14 Carolina viewer off of Kent Road in Raleigh --








And a very light dusting could be seen just southeast of Raleigh shown in this picture taken near Garner by News 14 Carolina viewer Bryan Lassiter --


No snow is in the forecast through the Thanksgiving week in our area. However, the North Carolina mountains may pick up some light snow later tonight.


Thursday, November 20, 2008

Winter Outlook Updated and Friday's Chance for Snow

The recent cold weather has had a lot of folks asking about the outlook for the upcoming winter. NOAA and the Climate Prediction Center released an update to the winter forecast today...



Based on this forecast, North Carolina can expect near normal temperatures and slightly below normal precipitation. Keep in mind, that is on average across the entire winter season. Unfortunately, you can't use that information to determine how much snow we may see this winter.
Speaking of snow, we had a few early snow flurries on Tuesday and we could very well see more early Friday morning. A disturbance combined with another blast of cold air should be enough to squeeze out some snow showers. If the snow comes down fast enough, a light dusting will be possible on grassy surfaces. The ground temperatures are currently running near 40 across the area. That combined with early morning temperatures just above freezing means we should not see an impact from the snow showers even though they could be falling during the morning commute.
Stay tuned to News 14 Carolina and Weather on the Ones for the latest forecast. If you see snow Friday, let us know and send us your weather pictures to weather@news14.com.



Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Is Snow Rare in November?


Tuesday's snow flurries have had folks wanting to know just how rare snow is in North Carolina during the month of November. While snow does not fall too often here in November, it has happened before. Back on November 19, 2000 accumulating snow fell across central North Carolina. The Triangle saw up to 2 inches on some grassy surfaces.
You can read more about the November 2000 snow by clicking to http://www4.ncsu.edu/~nwsfo/storage/cases/20001119/

Snow Flurries!

The first snowflakes of the season were reported across eastern North Carolina Tuesday. The Weather on the Ones Forecast Center received reports of flurries and snow showers from the Raleigh-Durham area to the Sandhills to the coast. Here's a look at some viewer pictures of the flurries...

Photo of snow flurries in Durham submitted by a News 14 Carolina viewer.






Snow flurries in Havelock submitted by a News 14 Carolina viewer.

If you have photos of Tuesday's flurries, you can share them with us by e-mailing them to weather@news14.com.

Monday, November 17, 2008

November 15, 2008 Tornadoes

The National Weather Service in Raleigh has released a detailed report from Saturday morning's tornadoes. You can view the report through the following link --
http://www4.ncsu.edu/~nwsfo/storage/cases/20081115/tornado.survey.summary.pdf

Sunday, November 16, 2008

Confirmation of EF-3 Tornado

This information from the National Weather service....

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RALEIGH NC
600 PM EST SAT NOV 15 2008
...TORNADO SURVEY OF EF-3 TORNADO NEAR WILSON AND ELM CITY IN WILSON
COUNTY.


THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE...IN CONJUNCTION WITH WILSON COUNTY
EMERGENCY SERVICES AND WILSON FIRE AND RESCUE...DETERMINED THAT AN
EF-3 TORNADO OCCURRED IN WILSON COUNTY.

THE TORNADO OCCURRED ALONG A DISCONTINUOUS...APPROXIMATELY EIGHT-MILE PATH THAT BEGAN WITH MINOR ROOF DAMAGE TO A DWELLING AND A SNAPPED TREE ALONG HARRISON
DRIVE JUST SOUTH OF WARD BOULEVARD. THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DAMAGE
WAS THEN NOTED TO THE NORTHEAST...ALONG LONDON CHURCH ROAD...SOUTH
OF ROUTE 1330.
ON LONDON CHURCH ROAD...ONE HOME WAS COMPLETELY DESTROYED AND
SWEPT OFF OF ITS FOUNDATION. BASED ON EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS AND THE
DAMAGE...FIRE AND RESCUE ESTIMATE THE HOME ROLLED AS MANY AS FOUR
TIMES. IN THIS HOME...THERE WAS UNFORTUNATELY ONE FATALITY AND
TWO INJURIES.


ACROSS THE ROAD FROM THIS HOME TO THE NORTHEAST...THE UPPER
PORTION OF A HOME WAS DESTROYED...AND ANOTHER HOME HAD A ROOF
COMPLETELY BLOWN AWAY WITH TREES ON TOP OF IT. IN THIS LATTER
HOME...EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS NOTED THERE WERE TWO MORE INJURIES...
CONDITIONS UNKNOWN. OTHER EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS SUGGESTED THERE WAS
LITTLE NOISE WITH THE EVENT UNTIL THE TORNADO STRUCK. SEVERAL
INDIVIDUALS WERE AWAKE FOR VARIOUS REASONS AROUND 330 AM...AND IT
WAS JUST A FEW MINUTES AFTER THIS WHEN THE TORNADO STRUCK THE
LONDON CHURCH ROAD AREA...ESTIMATED TO BE AT 340 AM.


THE TORNADO THEN FOLLOWED A DISCONTINUOUS PATH INTO ELM CITY.
THERE WERE NUMEROUS INDICATIONS OF TREE DAMAGE IN ELM CITY WITH A
PORCH ROOF BLOWN OFF...AND OUTBUILDINGS DAMAGED OR TOPPLED.
FINALLY...THE LAST NOTICEABLE DAMAGE WAS OBSERVED ALONG ROUTE
1400...AND JUST NORTH OF THE INTERSECTION OF HEFNER ROAD AND
ROUTE 1402...WHERE SMALL CLUSTERS OF TREES WERE SNAPPED AND
OUTBUILDINGS WERE DAMAGED. THE DAMAGE IN AND NORTHEAST OF ELM CITY
WAS CONSISTENT WITH EF-0 DAMAGE.
TIME/DATE: ESTIMATED FROM 330 AM TO 345 AM EST, SATURDAY NOVEMBER
15, 2008

PEAK WIND: 140 MPH
PATH LENGTH: APPROXIMATELY 8 MILES DISCONTINUOUS
PATH WIDTH: 100 YARDS
INJURIES: 4 KNOWN
FATALITIES: 1
$$
DJF/RWH

EF-Scale for Tornado Ratings


If you've been following news coverage of this weekend's tornadic thunderstorms that came across Johnston and Wilson counties, you're hearing about the strength of these tornadic winds expressed as 'E-F' instead of 'F' (for example, 'EF-2' rather than 'F-2').

Some of you may be wondering why thats happening in the news these days. After all, its supposed to be F-1, F-2, etc. Right? Thats how it was when you were growing up.

You're right as far as it having *been* classified that way before, but in 2007 meteorologists started using a new scale. Its still based on the Fujita Scale (the 'F' scale) but this is called the 'Enhanced Fujita' scale.
The scale still represents increasing degrees of damage from tornadic winds.
It was revised to reflect what was being seen out in the field when surveyors examined the aftermath of tornadoes. It also had to start taking into account more types of structures, different building materials and construction quality. It also has additional categories of vegetation.
In other words while storms may stay the same, the things they encounter may change over time. The science which we use to understand these storms also evolves over time.

The Storm Prediction Center has a wealth of information for you on this subject. Here's the link.

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/efscale/

PD

Saturday, November 15, 2008

Another Round of Storms Possible This Afternoon

Quick note, as we're evaluating the possibility of a squall line that could bring severe weather to our viewing area this afternoon and evening ahead of this vigorous cold front. Storm Prediction Center is getting ready to possibly issue another tornado watch, so tune to your Weather on the Ones Center for your forecast.
Tomorrow's forecast is expected to be calmer and cooler.
We'll update you on last night's tornadic storms later this weekend.
Pati

Governor Easley to Survey Storm Damage

State of North Carolina Office of the Governor

Michael F. Easley
Governor
Release: IMMEDIATE
Contact: Seth Effron
Date: 11/15/2008
Phone: (919) 733-5612
GOV. EASLEY’S STATEMENT ON STORM DAMAGE

Raleigh - Gov. Mike Easley issued this statement today following damage from the storm that passed through central and eastern North Carolina late Friday and early Saturday morning:

“I want to express my sympathy to the families who lost loved ones in this damaging storm as well as my concern for those who were injured, have had homes and property destroyed or damaged. We will do all we can to assist those in the affected areas. After local officials have had the opportunity to assess the areas, I will survey the damage.”

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Autumn Storm with Winter Implications...

As Lee pointed out below a strong cold front was responsible for wintry weather for the Carolina mountains as well as some sleet reports from cities across the Northern part of viewing area! This same system has caused quite a mess over New England, primarily New York! Here are some snowfall totals from the Empire State.
  • Roxbury, NY: 25.6"
  • Freeland, NY: 17.0"
  • Morrisville, NY: 15.5"
  • Worcester, NY: 10.5"

Along with heavy snow in New York there were also totals upward of 6" in Pennsylvania and a 3" total in Maryland.

For many baseball fans this same storm had a direct impact on the 2008 World Series between the Philadelphia Phillies and the Tampa Bay Rays. Game 5 started innocently enough with cold conditions and light rain, but by the 3rd inning the rain really picked up with the Phillies in the lead 2-1. As the rain continued to pour and the wind howl, officials kept the game rolling through the 4th and 5th innings. Not sure about you, but there's nothing worse than having to deal with wind chills in the 30's unless you have to deal with it wet! It wasn't until the Rays scored a run in the top of the 6th to tie the game at 2 that the grounds crew came out and the game suspended after 30 more minutes of waiting.

Fast forward to this evening. Conditions in Philly will be just as cold, but much drier. The game is scheduled to resume at 8:37pm. So, if you are not a fan of watching 9 innings of baseball never fear it's only 3 and a half innings to decide the winner. Either we have a new champion or we return to Tampa Bay for game 6 and, oh yeah, a dome!

Winter Outlook


The above photos look like winter scenes taken in January or February, but those photos were actually taken Tuesday morning, October 28 when snow showers fell in the North Carolina mountains. The top photo was taken from the Pisgah Inn along the Blue Ridge Parkway at about 5000 ft in elevation. The second photo was taken around Grandfather Mountain.

The cold front that brought the cold temperatures to produce the snow in the mountains even produced some isolated late sleet around the Triangle on Monday afternoon. We received reports of sleet from viewers in Pittsboro, Apex, Cary, and Louisburg.

So does this late October cold snap mean we are in for a cold and snowy winter? No, not necessarily. While temperatures have been colder than normal the past couple of days, we cannot make any correlation between the current weather and what we can expect over the next several months.

Long range forecasts for winter 2008-2009 have been mixed. The latest forecast from the Climate Prediction Center (shown below) calls for above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation for December, January, and February.



Keep in mind we could still have a few cold snaps and even some winter precipitation in a winter that is on average warmer and drier than normal. And yes, it is too early to answer that question for snow lovers of how much snow we can expect this winter. We can tell you we see an average of 7 inches of snow each winter in the Triangle, but the last few winters have fallen well below that normal.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Weekend Fall Foliage Update

The fall colors have peaked in the higher elevations of the North Carolina mountains and are at their peak around the Asheville area this weekend. Check out the latest fall foliage report at http://www.visitnc.com/fallcolor/fallcolor_report.asp.

Unfortunately, the weather may not be that great to check out the fall colors this weekend. Rain is likely across the state beginning Friday afternoon into Saturday. We expect a soaking rain in our part of the state especially late Friday night and Saturday morning when an 1.0 to 1.5" of rain will be possible.

Looking ahead to next week, we expect a big cool down for the middle of the week with our first freeze possible in central North Carolina by next Thursday morning.

Stay tuned to News 14 Carolina for the latest updates on these forecasts with Weather on the Ones available every 10 minutes only on Time Warner Cable!

Monday, October 20, 2008

Fall Foliage Pictures

Check out these photos of fall foliage around the Blue Ridge Parkway and Grandfather Mountain taken at the end of last week...





If you have fall foliage pictures to share, we'd love to see them! Send your photos to weather@news14.com.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Fall Foliage Update

Fall foliage is near its peak in the higher elevations of the North Carolina like near Grandfather Mountain near where the above picture was taken this week. Read more on this weekend's color report by clicking to http://www.visitnc.com/fallcolor/fallcolor_report.asp

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Afternoon Update

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Near Record October Heat

We're keeping an eye on our record highs for the next couple of days as the current "October heat wave" continues. Yesterday's high at RDU of 85 was only a degree away from the record set in 1985. Here are the records to watch for today and tomorrow --
  • October 15 -- 88 in 1985
  • October 16 -- 85 in 1989

Thursday should be our best chance to at least tie the record high. That will be the last in our string of warm days. A cold front will move through the state Friday bringing a chance for showers and cooler temperatures for the weekend. In some spots around the Triangle Friday, it will be a struggle to even reach 70. The low 60s are expected for highs on Saturday!

Thursday, October 09, 2008

Fall Foliage Update



More and more fall colors are showing up in western North Carolina. Higher elevations like Grandfather Mountain are reported to be near peak for fall color. The above photos were taken from the Grandfather Mountain area. The peak of fall color for elevations above 5000 feet is forecast to come in the next 7 to 10 days.


Read more about the fall color outlook this weekend across the mountains by clicking to http://www.visitnc.com/fallcolor/fallcolor_report.asp.

Thursday, October 02, 2008

Fishing Forecast



There's a new service from news14.com --- a fishing forecast for the North Carolina coast. Check it out if you have a fishing trip planned for the coast this weekend. You'll find the link on our coastal weather page at news14.com or click to http://www.coastalcarolinafishingreport.com/tv14reports.htm

For the latest news and weather from the coast, News 14 Carolina and Weather on the Ones is now available on Time Warner Cable systems on the coast including areas around Wilmington, Jacksonville, Morehead City, and surrounding areas!

Wednesday, October 01, 2008

Afternoon Update

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Appearing Soon: Fall Colors

Fall colors taken in a previous year near Grandfather Mountain.

Now that October has arrived the beautiful colors of fall aren't too far away! Right on cue, cooler air is moving into parts of the state today behind a cold front. Mornings lows will drop to the 30s in the higher elevations of the mountains the next couple of mornings. That should help the progress of the color change in western North Carolina. Already, there are reports of some patches of fall color around Grandfather Mountain. The peak of fall color typically comes in the second and third week of October in the higher elevations of the mountains and later in the month for lower elevations.
Weather conditions should allow for vivid colors in the mountains this year. You can find the latest fall foliage report at www.visitnc.com/fallcolor
If you're travelling to the mountains this weekend and spot some early signs of the color change, we'd like to see it. Send your fall foliage photos to weather@news14.com We'll share them for everyone here on our Weather on the Ones blog!

Friday, September 26, 2008

Hello and Thank you, Sunny Days!











In this case I'm not referring to the weather, but to a group of great kids I spoke to in Garner at Sunny Days Daycare earlier this month. We talked about Tropical weather and our busy bees got right into learning about weather safety which included a game of " When thunder roars, go indoors!" Christy Avery, the Daycare director, shared some pictures of our visit.




Our students that day made some adorable drawings that I wanted to share with you .








The sun has returned for our Friday afternoon in some areas, but we're expecting the area of low pressure that came onshore Thursday night to still influence our weather somewhat over the beginning of our weekend. It is expected to dissipate as it makes a move north and east toward the Mid-Atlantic, so we'll have intermittent clouds with a chance of passing showers Saturday, less of a chance on Sunday with partly sunny skies and a little bit of a warm-up.

Next week expect a cold front to sweep through our area about mid-week which will bring some showers once again and perhaps another cool spell by next weekend!

Storm Pictures from Carolina Beach

Here's a look at storm photos taken Thursday by a News 14 Carolina viewer at Carolina Beach. You can submit your storm photos to us by e-mailing weather@news14.com.












Thursday, September 25, 2008

Coastal Low -- Early Thursday Morning Update

Here's the latest update early this morning from the National Hurricane Center...

SPECIAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE STATEMENT
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
435 AM EDT THU SEP 25 2008

A WELL-DEFINED EXTRATROPICAL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM CENTERED ABOUT 225 MILES SOUTHEAST OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA-NORTH CAROLINA BORDER IS MOVING WEST-NORTHWESTWARD AT 5 TO 10 MPH. SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ARE GRADUALLY BECOMING BETTER ORGANIZED AND THIS SYSTEM COULD DEVELOP INTO A SUBTROPICAL OR TROPICAL CYCLONE BEFORE THE SYSTEM MOVES INLAND ALONG THE ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERN U.S. COAST ON FRIDAY. REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT THIS SYSTEM BECOMES A SUBTROPICAL OR TROPICAL CYCLONE... STRONG WINDS...COASTAL FLOODING...HIGH SURF...AND DANGEROUS RIP CURRENTS WILL CONTINUE ALONG PORTIONS OF THE SOUTHEASTERN AND MID-ATLANTIC U.S. COASTAL REGIONS DURING THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS. OUTER RAIN BANDS CONTINUE TO SPREAD ONSHORE THE NORTH CAROLINA COAST THIS MORNING...AND BUOY AND SHIP REPORTS INDICATE WINDS IN EXCESS OF 50 MPH ARE OCCURRING MORE THAN 100 MILES FORM THE CENTER. AN AIR FORCE RESERVE UNIT RECONNAISSANCE AIRCRAFT SCHEDULED TO INVESTIGATE THE SYSTEM LATER THIS MORNING WILL PROVIDE BETTER INFORMATION ON ITS STRUCTURE AND INTENSITY. INTERESTS ALONG THE U.S. EAST COAST FROM THE CAROLINAS NORTHWARD TO MID-ATLANTIC REGION SHOULD CLOSELY MONITOR STATEMENTS FROM THEIR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECAST OFFICES... AND ALSO HIGH SEAS FORECASTS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER IN WASHINGTON D.C. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND WARNINGS.

ANOTHER LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM OF TROPICAL ORIGIN CENTERED ABOUT 180 MILES EAST-NORTHEAST OF THE TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS IS MOVING NORTHWARD AT AROUND 10 MPH. SATELLITE IMAGERY INDICATES THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY HAS CONTINUED TO INCREASE AND BECOME A LITTLE BETTER ORGANIZED THIS MORNING. UPPER-LEVEL WINDS ARE EXPECTED TO GRADUALLY BECOME A LITTLE MORE CONDUCIVE FOR A TROPICAL DEPRESSION OR A TROPICAL STORM TO DEVELOP DURING THE NEXT DAY OR SO. REPORTS FROM NEARBY SHIPS INDICATE SUSTAINED WINDS OF 30 TO 35 MPH NORTH OF THE CENTER. A NOAA RECONNAISSANCE AIRCRAFT IS CURRENTLY ENROUTE TO PROVIDE A BETTER ESTIMATE OF THE LOCATION AND INTENSITY OF THE LOW. AS THIS WEATHER SYSTEM MOVES FARTHER NORTH TODAY...THE THREAT FOR HEAVY RAINFALL AND ASSOCIATED FLOODS AND MUD SLIDES OVER HISPANIOLA...PUERTO RICO...AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS WILL GRADUALLY SUBSIDE.

$$
FORECASTER STEWART

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Afternoon Update

video

Coastal Low

Our weather through the rest of the week will be impacted by low pressure that is strengthening off the Carolina coast today. Already, our winds are picking up and look for windy conditions to continue into Thursday. Along the coast, gusts to 40 or 45mph will be possible this afternoon. Inland toward Raleigh and Fayetteville gusts to 30 to 35mph will be possible.

The low is developing along a stationary front and does not currently have tropical characteristics. However, as the low interacts with warm ocean waters off our coast, the National Hurricane Center now says there is some potential that the system could gain some tropical characteristics.


If that happens, the storm would become a subtropical storm or a tropical storm and would be named. Regardless of whether the storm is named or not, the impact to eastern and central North Carolina will be the same -- rainy and windy weather for Thursday. It will likely be cool as well as temperatures will not make it out of the low to mid 60s around the Triangle and the mid to upper 60s in the Sandhills. Coastal North Carolina will likely be warmer with temperatures in the 70s.

Heavy rains and strong winds may cause a few problems with some downed trees or powerlines especially closer to the coast where the winds will be the strongest. Coastal flooding and beach erosion may be an issue as well especially along the Crystal Coast and Outer Banks.

Follow the storm with the latest information by tuning in to our Weather on the Ones updates only on News 14 Carolina.

Friday, September 19, 2008

While we've passed the peak of hurricane season, its always a good time to plan

With help from the ASPCA: Disaster Planning For Pets: Do You Know What To Pack?

North Carolina has had an easier year of it as far as tropical storms go, at least as compared to those along the Gulf coast and Midwest. News 14 Carolina Meteorologist Lee Ringer had an earlier post about the passing of the peak of our 2008 hurricane season. It is always a good time to plan, whether it be for tropical weather evacuations, severe local storms or even winter weather.

As we have pets in my family, I am always concerned about protecting them when weather is a factor (especially since I may be working during the weather and they're at home!)
I love the ASPCA website, as there are always great tips for pet care. While this evacuation list for pets focuses more on dogs and cats, talk to your veterinarian about how this can be better augmented to fit the needs of your unique pet. Some of these things can be placed in a container for long-term storage and some can be obtained in a pinch. If you regularly travel with your pet, you may have these things set to go already!

The ASPCA would like to offer the following list of essential items to pack for your animal companions in advance, should you be faced with evacuation:
Pet first-aid kit and guide book
3 to 7 days' worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food
Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
Litter or paper toweling
Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
Dishes for food and water
Extra harness and leash
Photocopies of medical records
Waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires
Bottled water—at least seven days' worth for each person and pet
Traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet
Flashlight
Blanket
Recent photos of your pet(s)
Especially for cats: Pillowcase or EvackSack, toys, scoopable litter
Especially for dogs: Long leash and yard stake, toys and chew toys, a week's worth of cage liner

for more information, here's the ASPCA website link:
http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=sitemap

Have a great weekend!
Pati Darak,
Meteorologist, News 14 Carolina

Past the Peak of Hurricane Season

Now that we are in the second half of September, we are past what is the traditional peak in the Atlantic hurricane season. However, that doesn't mean we can breath a sigh of relief just yet. Hurricanes can still impact North Carolina during the fall months. One of the worst hurricanes in North Carolina history, Hurricane Hazel, made landfall on October 15, 1954. Hazel produced wind gusts of 90mph in the Triangle.

Meteorologist Jeff Orrock with the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Raleigh sent us an e-mail this week with more information on tropical activity in the fall months in North Carolina. Here's a map Jeff provided with all of the storms that have impacted our state in October and November from 1852 through 2007:


Tuesday, September 16, 2008

9 Years Ago: Hurricane Floyd

Nine years ago today North Carolina Hurricane Floyd made landfall along the North Carolina coast devastating much of the eastern part of the state with flooding rains. Take a look back at the storm through this link from the National Weather Service Office in Raleigh --
http://www4.ncsu.edu/~nwsfo/storage/cases/19990915/